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Company Charging Others for Lunch

Discussion in 'Wage and Hour, Overtime' started by AJ00, Feb 15, 2020.

  1. AJ00

    AJ00 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
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    I have been working for a restoration company for a year now, everything was (near) perfect when I started, but over the past 3 or 4 months they have started to make very drastic changes in work 'rules' and environment. One of these changes is the fact that I am no longer able to take a lunch due to the multiple fast paced jobs that I deal with on a daily basis, but my company still requires me to put on my timecard that I did in fact take a lunch break, then they add the 'expense' of me taking a lunch break (that I do not take) to the list of other expenses for the company/building I'm working at to pay for, thus meaning my company is getting reimbursed for my non-existent lunch break.
     
  2. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    army judge Super Moderator

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    Work breaks, rest periods | Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry

    This is the MN state agency to whom you are free to whine, moan, groan, and/or snitch out a recalcitrant, obnoxious, uncaring, scofflaw employer:

    Wage and hour questions?
    Minimum wage, PTO, employment laws, paychecks, termination, breaks, employee rights, overtime, family and medical leave (FMLA), etc.

    Call: 651-284-5070 or 800-342-5354

    Email: dli.laborstandards@state.mn.us


    Under Minnesota law, an employer must provide "sufficient" unpaid time for a meal break to employees who work at least eight consecutive hours.

    Although the law doesn't say exactly how long a meal break must last, Minnesota regulations state that a 30-minute break will usually qualify as a true meal break.

    Minnesota employers must provide both rest and meal breaks.

    Although employees must be paid for shorter breaks they are allowed to take during the day, employers are not required to provide these breaks in the first place.

    Meal Breaks and Rest Breaks in Minnesota
     

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