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13 Year Old Runaway, wont come back home.

Discussion in 'Juvenile Crime, Law & Court' started by bmendez, Oct 14, 2014.

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  1. bmendez

    bmendez Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I have soul, physical and legal custody of my children, My 13 year ran away home to my parents home and now he wont and refuses to come home. My parents wont let him come home either.
    What form do I need to fill out to go with the police to pick him up since I got a police to escort me yesterday to pick him up?

    Also I've asked for the football team that my child plays to pull him from playing and they have also refused to listen to me, what do I do?
     
  2. disagreeable

    disagreeable Well-Known Member

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    File a runaway report. Press charges against your parents for harboring a runaway. Demand the police detain him and return him.
     
  3. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    Simply go to your parents house and pick him up. If you are met with resistance then call police to assist you.
    If you know where he is then he is not missing, so you might not get far trying to make a missing person report, but police can assist by addressing those who interfere or contribute to delinquency.
    As for football, you have control over that as well. If he goes to practice or games without your permission then go pick him up. The school can not overrule you on this.
     
  4. Disabled Vet

    Disabled Vet Active Member

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    Why did this kid runway to start with? Why are your parents allowing him to stay? Something isn't right in this.... What did you do?
     
  5. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    This is a 13 year old. The parent could have "done" something as dreadful as refusing to allow the kid to spend the weekend at Jimmy's unsupervised, or told the kid to get in there and pick up his room NOW. I don't think we can assume fault on the part of the parents.
     
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  6. Betty3

    Betty3 Super Moderator

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    Good point & probably true, cbg (though we don't know for sure).
     
  7. CdwJava

    CdwJava Moderator

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    As suggested, go to their house and collect your child. If they refuse to release him, call the police. Your parents can be charged with a crime for encouraging the delinquency of a child. If, however, you kicked the child out of the house or in some way abused him, you might find yourself in trouble.

    Why did he run away?

    A phone call. No form is needed. You call, ask for them to conduct a civil standby, and wait. Keep in mind that they might not be able to respond right away so you might have to wait a while. Perhaps you can simply go to his school and pick him up from there.

    What did your parents have to say when you told them you were going to get the police involved?

    What kind of football team is this? Is there another parent who wants the child to play?

    If this is your sole responsibility, you can simply keep your child home from practice. And what football team is still practicing this late in the year? He's too young for high school football, and youth football or Pop Warner type football is either done or nearly so.

    And, why do you want to keep him from playing? Could this be the reason he got mad and took off?
     
  8. Disabled Vet

    Disabled Vet Active Member

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    Of course not... Don't assume anything. It would be nice to know why this kid decided to take flight. You ever hear of a CASA? That is one of the first questions asked... " Why did you leave your parents house? "

    You would say " WHAT " at some of the answers. So yes it's important to know why this child decided to take flight.
     
  9. CdwJava

    CdwJava Moderator

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    However, the reason for the flight won't remove the parents' ability to seize the child from the grandparents. Until child services or the police step in to take the child into protective custody and initiate court proceedings, the "why" will have little to no impact.
     
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  10. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    The why might never be known.
    Children often behave irrationally, emotionally, and impulsively.
    They, as do all humans, lie.
    They also just clam up, and say nothing.
    As far the why, the law doesn't care anyway.
    Little Sarah or Samuel ran away from home, leaving the custody and control of their custodial parent(s) or guardian(s), and that isn't permitted.
    That's the essential element of this particular offense, absenting oneself from the care, custody, and control of their parent without proper parental approval.
    The law can often be an uncaring, unconcerned, judgmental beast.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014
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  11. ElleMD

    ElleMD Well-Known Member

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    While children can be impulsive, one would hope that the grandparents would not keep their own child from seeing the grandchild unless there was more to the story than a messy room and a sulking kid. Anything is possible, but odds are there is more going on here than an everyday spat between parent and child.
     
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  12. CdwJava

    CdwJava Moderator

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    The proper action for the grandparent would have been to contact the authorities fi there is something more going on. They may not yet be aware of that, but if the OP shows up with the police, they will be.
     
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  13. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    Families can be odd, though. If I had shown up at at the door of one set of grandparents announcing that I didn't want to live with my parents any more, I would have been questioned about why but anything short of physical abuse would have been met with my being marched right back home where I belonged. My other grandparents, however, would not have asked me a thing but just settled me in; they'd have notified my parents where I was but would have strenuously objected to my being returned home until I was ready to go.

    I still say without knowing a WHOLE lot more about the situation we can't say that the parents are the ones out of line.
     
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  14. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    One would hope, as do I, but I've seen grandparents behave as foolishly as children.
    As a grandparent, I hope this never happens.
    If it did happen, I'd settle the little rascal in, make sure he or she was okay physically, then I'd contact his or her parents.
    I'd also hustle the little dickens back home ASAP.
    Sadly, some children do flee their homes because they are abused, neglected, molested, or maltreated.
    Let's all hope that isn't what drove this little rascal to flee.
    If it was behind his absconding, I hope the parents, the child, and the state get it sorted.
     
  15. Betty3

    Betty3 Super Moderator

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    It is sometimes surprising what grandparents will do when it comes to their grandchildren.
     
  16. txls

    txls Well-Known Member

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    We have been tempted many times to keep our grandkids from their mother who is not a very good mother, but we're not going to jail. However under certain circumstances of physical abuse, I might risk it. CPS is often very slow to act and we have found that the wheels of justice turn very slowly as well. In this case, not enough information to justify grandparents refusing to send the kid home.

    I had a 16yr old niece who ran away from home to my house. I convinced her mother to let her stay. After 6 weeks her mother insisted she come back home. I had to let her go.
     

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