1. Free Legal Help, Legal Forms and Lawyers. TheLaw.com has been providing free legal assistance online since 1995. Our most popular destinations for legal help are below. It only takes a minute to join our legal community!

    Dismiss Notice

Wage assignment

Discussion in 'Alimony & Spousal Support' started by seniorwoman, Mar 1, 2015.

  1. seniorwoman

    seniorwoman Law Topic Starter New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have two questions:
    #1. I went to the self-help family law dept. and an attorney helped me with the paperwork for spousal support.
    I had asked the attorney if that is all the paper work needed, just the wage assignment signed by the judge.
    She said yes. I served my ex's employer. He is claiming that I didn't give the proper paperwork in order for him to reply
    for have a fair hearing, and that I am in violation with his due process. I noticed on the back of the wage assignment
    that it says that an attachment should have been with it in regards to this, but it also says that if it is not, then they
    could obtain one. My question is, since I served the payroll dept. are they not supposed to notifly him?
    #2 He is also claiming another violation that I didn't notify him, personally, about it. Again, Is that my responsiblity?
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

    Messages:
    33,224
    Likes Received:
    5,313
    Trophy Points:
    113

    Without reading what you created, knowing exactly what you did and when, we can't properly advise you.
    However, if you have made a mistake or two in service or preparation, you can GENERALLY file anew.
    In other words, you made a few procedural mistakes you can file and serve your defendant again.
    Small claims is somewhat simple if you READ EVERYTHING BEFORE DOING ANYTHING.

    Now collecting a small claims judgment is harder than pleading the case.
    You can hire a collections firm to do the heavy lifting by splitting your take with them. Most of them require 1/5 to 1/3 of what they collect.
    You can find many of these companies by searching the Internet, or asking a lawyer or CPA you trust.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015

Share This Page