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Strike loss of health insurance

Discussion in 'Employee Benefits, Pensions' started by sreak500, Sep 18, 2019.

  1. sreak500

    sreak500 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
    Michigan
    The factory I work for is in Lansing mi. Our Union called a nationwide strike on Sunday night September 15 at 11:59 pm. Our health insurance, vision and dental was supposed to last until the end of the month because it’s paid once a month. Instead everyone’s coverage nationwide has been cancelled on September 16. We were not properly informed and neither was our union. I never received a phone call or letter I had to find out on Facebook. September 16 our union posted yes we still have insurance until the end of the month. September 17 our union posted again saying our insurance has been canceled and we are now covered under cobra insurance, no vision or dental.
    Is this legal?
    Who should I contact about this and do I need an attorney?
     
  2. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    Contact your union rep.
     
  3. hrforme

    hrforme Active Member

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    what you need to find out is who is responsible for the COBRA payments while on strike. It is possible your CBA/union would be responsible....if so, there's no real difference since the coverage is 100% the same.

    otherwise you should be offered dental and vision as COBRA but self-paid
     
  4. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    General Motors is no longer paying the health care costs for the tens of thousands of auto workers who went on strike on Monday, shifting the costs instead to a union fund.

    More than 49,000 union workers walked off their jobs on Sunday night, starting a nationwide strike at General Motors. As negotiations enter their third day on Wednesday, the health coverage for striking workers will no longer be covered by GM.

    Mary Kay Henry, the president of the Service Employees International Union which represents more than 2 million members slammed the news in a statement, calling it "heartless and unconscionable."

    “GM's decision to yank healthcare coverage away from their dedicated employees, in the dead of night, with no warning, is heartless and unconscionable. GM's actions could put people's lives at risk, from the factory worker who needs treatment for their asthma to the child who relies on their parents' insurance for chemotherapy," she said. "Thankfully these men and women have their union, which is making sure working people and their families can continue to get care."

    In a statement to ABC News, GM expressed sympathy that "strikes can be difficult and disruptive to families."

    "While on strike, some benefits shift to being funded by the union's strike fund, and in this case hourly employees are eligible for union-paid COBRA so their health care benefits can continue," the statement added.

    Union leaders have argued that GM workers deserved a bigger slice of the company's record profits, which they say have totaled $35 billion in North America over the last three years. Union members are calling for higher wages, retention of a health insurance plan in which workers pay about 4% of the costs, an improved pension plan and assurances that GM -- the makers of Buick, Cadillac, GMC and Chevrolet -- will not close four plants in Maryland, Ohio and Michigan.

    As negotiations remain at a stalemate, some on the front lines say they hope for a swift resolution.

    Machinist Clarence Trinity who was picketing at a GM factory in a Detroit suburb told the Associated Press that he couldn't "see this lasting too long," adding that "both sides are losing bad."

    ABC News' Bull Hutchinson and Joshua Hoyos contributed to this report.



    GM no longer paying for striking workers' health insurance
     
  5. flyingron

    flyingron Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the world of collective bargaining. Nobody has responsibility to explain that your behavior has consequences. The only obligation was them to tell you that you are COBRA-eligible, which they appear to have done (and fortunately for you, funded with the moneys you've paid into them over the years). Yep, you'll have to sit on the dental/vision issues in the interim.
     
    Disabled Vet and hrforme like this.

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