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State of arizona law on contracts

Discussion in 'Human Resources' started by Dwnhiler, Feb 6, 2021.

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  1. Dwnhiler

    Dwnhiler Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I went through a 6 months residency program for registered nurse to work in the operating room. I wanted to leave the hospital but they told me that i signed a 2 year contract of which i dont remember signing. And that if I leave early I will need to pay $20,000. So I asked for a copy of the contract and it has been months and still they have not given me a copy. Whats my next move? Because I dont want to work for this hospital anymore. Is the state of arizona have any law against these type of contracts?

    Thank you
     
  2. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    How many times have you requested the document? Who have you spoken to about it?

    It is common to have to repay certain costs when you don't fulfill your obligation.

    Your answers are in the contract. Put more effort into obtaining a copy. You don't have your own copies from when you began the program?


    Odds are that you did agree to this. You are probably best off to remain where you are until your time is up then move on.
     
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  3. Dwnhiler

    Dwnhiler Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I have asked for it just once. Are their words I can use for them to expedite the copies of my contract?
    I spoke to my supervisor but I dont think she really knows the detail of the contract.

    Thank you.
     
  4. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Well, here's a life lesson from the school of hard knocks. Never sign anything without keeping a copy. Your phone has a camera. Use it to photograph what you sign.

    "I quit."

    If there's a contract, that'll smoke it out real quick.
     
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  5. Dwnhiler

    Dwnhiler Law Topic Starter New Member

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  6. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    I suggest you retrieve YOUR copy of the document that you signed.

    You can READ the entire document, especially the page upon which you affixed YOUR signature.

    Once you've read and reviewed the document, your memory will be refreshed.



    Don't YOU possess the ORIGINAL document you signed?

    I suspect if a lawsuit erupted, your employer would have a copy of the document for their lawyers to review.

    I suggest you SEARCH your home (perhaps a storage facility) in an effort to locate YOUR copy of the document.


    You don't have to work for anyone.

    You could resign tomorrow, and you'd be no longer in their employ.

    However, the issue of the $20,000 will probably NOT disappear!

    The 13th Amendment abolished slavery in the United States of America.

    Passed by Congress on January 31, 1865, and ratified on December 6, 1865, the 13th amendment abolished slavery in the United States and provides that: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction."
     
  7. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    No. Those contracts are quite legal and quite common when an employer makes a substantial investment in training an employee.
     
  8. Dwnhiler

    Dwnhiler Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I will try to look for them. Thank you so much
     
  9. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Perhaps someone was hired under the same terms you were.

    Maybe you can ask her/him if he/she would redact all personal information and give you copy of the document for you to review?
     
  10. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    Try "please".
    You asked months ago. It seems clear nobody remembers this request.
    Ask at HR, or with whoever runs the program you were enrolled in. Your immediate supervisor might not be the best contact.
    You might even put the request in writing and mail it to them.
     
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  11. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Who are "they"? What was the title of the person who told you this? When does the two year period expire?

    "Months"? In context, that could be anywhere from 2-23 months ago.

    And it appears that, in the "months" since the unknown person told you about this contract, you haven't followed up once with him/her (or some other person). That's rather hard to understand.

    Rather obviously, you should follow up with the person who told you about the contract and/or pay a visit to the hospital's HR department.

    Ultimately, if you end up not getting a copy of the contract in question, then you'll have to decide either to ride out the rest of the two-year period or take a chance and leave without knowing if the contract exists.

    No.

    How about, "Hey, could I please get a copy of that contract you told me about 7 months ago?
     

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