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Only Female in a Male Dominated Car Dealership

Discussion in 'Discrimination & Sexual Harassment' started by lisaleon85, Feb 1, 2020.

  1. lisaleon85

    lisaleon85 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I am the only female that works in a male dominated car dealership. I have been the only female that has worked here for over 4 years. I have been the top performer several months and very well respected among my peers. I have always been easy to work with and fair with my co-workers and managers. I have not had any disciplinary write ups or misconduct and do not have any issues with my performance.

    My dealership recent promoted someone who worked along with me on the sales floor into a sales manager. This person and I did not get along well on the sales floor and always saw me as a “threat.” I never engaged and always minded my own business when he would try to ruffle my feathers.

    Recently with him in his manager role he has been very unfair to me and very difficult to work with. He is technically the “third” manager in charge and has a General Manager and General Sales Manager that oversees him. He does duties as opening and closing the store, and helping with car deals when the other two are not around. I only have to report to him or work with him when he is the only manager on duty.

    He is not well respected or liked among the other sales staff. Most people say he is not the most respectful and does not manage very well. Lately I have been told by other sales people that he has been “gossiping” about me and calling me the B-word when I am not around. He has been blaming me for the reason sales are lacking and for the bad culture in the store. None are true and I come to work everyday, get my work done and do a great job at it.

    Before month end I was working on a very large commissioned paid car deal with another sales person. We both get along well and both have the same opinion on this manager. When I came in today I find out I was not given half the credit for the car deal that I worked on. The commission that would be paid is a very large amount. There was no logical reason why I would not be given my half of the deal. The other sales person told me that the sales manager is purposely not putting me on half, hoping that I would quit once I found out.

    This is not the first instance where he has tried to take away my commissions on deals that I have worked hard for and was well deserved. This is coming to the point where I would need to start speaking to my HR manager or find legal help. The environment he has created has made me feel very segregated because of my gender. I feel very disrespected with the way he talks about me to other people and talks down to me whenever I try to work with him.

    I am reaching out asking if I have any legal recourse and should consider hiring a lawyer. I feel I am missing out on great opportunities at my dealership because this manager is starting to paint a bad image of myself to others. Not only has money been taken from me due to his lack of management skills but also my faith in the company that they will take care of their employees.
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    You should never discuss your financial arrangements with anyone but your management.

    I suggest you discuss the perceived slight with the general manager.

    If you approach it calmly, unemotionally, and logically; you'll more than likely receive what you believe you are owed.

    If you don't, then it is time for you to seek new employment.



    You should also inform the general manager of any prior slights, but don't be surprised if nothing is done.

    Employers tend to dislike "whiners" and "complainers", especially in highly competitive positions.


    You have the right to talk to a lawyer.

    Only YOU can decide whether you should seek justice, or if justice is available to you for what you perceive as a wrong.
     
  3. lisaleon85

    lisaleon85 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I never discussed my financial arrangement with one. It was known that this deal was going to be a large commission due to the make and model of the car. I was informed by the other sales person on the deal that the sales manager plans to not put me on the deal. He is hoping I quit. I feel there is nepotism because I am a female and he does not like me working there still.

     
  4. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    nep·o·tism
    /ˈnepəˌtizəm/

    noun
    1. the practice among those with power or influence of favoring relatives or friends, especially by giving them jobs.

    Nepotism has nothing to do ones gender.
     
  5. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Your feelings have no legal relevance.

    If there is nepotism, or even favoritism, the laws care nothing about that.

    The law will address a situation where people are discriminated against, which is neither favoritism or nepotism.

    It is NOT illegal for the owner of a business to pay his grandchild $100/hour to perform the same job that other employees receive $25/hour.

    Hoping you quit, even wishing for you to die, are actions for which the law offers no remedy.

    Hate speech isn't illegal, YET!

    Gossip or hearsay aren't generally admissible in matters before the bar.

    Your easiest remedy is to seek employment where employees are NOT treated with disdain or disregard.
     
    justblue likes this.
  6. Disabled Vet

    Disabled Vet Active Member

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    Maybe start with bringing your concerns to the upper management. Let them address this issue before going off the deep end.
     
    hrforme likes this.
  7. ElleMD

    ElleMD Well-Known Member

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    If this guy just doesn't like you and is in general a horrible manager and others feel that same way about him, that isn't illegal, just bad business. Companies are legally allowed to make terrible decisions and promote those who don't deserve it. What isn't allowed legally is treating you and only you badly because you are a woman (or because of another legally protected characteristic but we don't know any basis for those). Disliking you because you are good at your job and therefore a threat is not illegal, just shallow.

    You can go a couple ways with this. I can't tell you which way to go as you know these people and your workplace best.

    1. Ignore it, suck it up, don't let him bother you, and continue to do an awesome job.

    2. Schedule a meeting with this guy in private and bring up the latest sale and maybe one or two other big instances of objective unfairness he is responsible for and ask him in a non-threatening and professional way to explain them. Ask why you aren't being given credit for the commission when it is your sale. Leave out the 3rd hand rumors. You don't know if they are true and even if he said them, if it was really what happened as opposed to an excuse he gave to "save face" to someone.

    3. If there is some credible reason to believe that his behavior toward you is more than just poor management skills and fear, and really is based on being female, take that evidence to HR/upper management, however your company works.

    4. If his behavior is truly egregious just go to upper management and let them know what he has been doing. Stay away from rumors and gossip and stick to things you know as facts. This one comes with a warning- as a general rule, I'd advise not going nuclear unless you expect one of you to not be there the next day. While a sexual discrimination complaint may or may not have some protection from retaliation, general complaints of unfairness and poor management do not. No guarantee they will let either or you go or the environment will make it so you feel you don't want to be there while they address it, but I'd generally not make this the first option unless its your only viable option.
     
    shadowbunny likes this.
  8. P1776

    P1776 Member

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    You might be putting the cart before the horse.
    As someone else stated, going to your Sales Manager or General Manager with the grievance, and give them an opportunity to make it right would be the appropriate course of action.
     

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