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Former employer laptop

Discussion in 'Termination: Firing & Resignation' started by Hobbitcomp, Dec 11, 2018.

  1. Hobbitcomp

    Hobbitcomp Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
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    I recently resigned/quit a position at an employer. During the course if my employment I was required to use company funds to purchase a laptop as directed by the general manager. I was also instructed to purchase a USB to back up the files.

    I have a different job with a different employer. I explained to my previous employer how to restore the computer to factory default, format and restore. Explained that I was never assigned nor was the laptop set up to be a company device. The general manager stated, treat it as if it was my personal property unless I no longer work there.

    They have now asked for my personal Microsoft log in twice. After being told by myself that I would not give them access to my personal Microsoft account, email, and cloud linked to the computer.

    What are my options if they fail to cease and desist.
     
  2. Hobbitcomp

    Hobbitcomp Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I mentioned the USB drive as the company has no interest in the where abouts of said device.
     
  3. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Assuming you have long ago returned the laptop, you have no further obligation to your former employer.

    How you handle the hassling is up to you but if it was me, I would just say no and ignore further requests, block calls and emails, and move on.
     
    Michael Wechsler likes this.
  4. Hobbitcomp

    Hobbitcomp Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I left the laptop at my employer. The only things I removed were the personal tools of my trade. Thank you for the advise. It was more or less my plan to just ignore them.
     
  5. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Options?

    You explained it well above.

    You can do as requested, or resist at your own financial peril.
     
  6. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Your options are to provide the requested information or not to provide it.

    Did you really need us to tell you that?
     
  7. Hobbitcomp

    Hobbitcomp Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I was more seeing if there was legal problem that can arise and create problems for me. I don't quite understand the financial peril angle.
     
  8. hrforme

    hrforme Active Member

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    "During the course if my employment I was required to use company funds to purchase a laptop as directed by the general manager." and " Explained that I was never assigned nor was the laptop set up to be a company device. The general manager stated, treat it as if it was my personal property unless I no longer work there."

    why was it required if it was to be for personal use? That doesn't pass a smell test.

    What files were you supposed to backup if not work files?

    If you've turned the physical device in, that's about all you can do. If there is any work product on the USB, you should wipe personal documents/etc and turn it back into the ex-employer.
     
  9. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Chances of that are slim.

    That refers to the fact that anybody can sue anybody for anything and getting sued can be quite costly.

    Again, the chances of that are slim.
     
  10. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Not sure what the second sentence means. As you noted, your employer can restore the computer to factory settings.
     
  11. Michael Wechsler

    Michael Wechsler Administrator Staff Member

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    Let's assume that the general manager was unsophisticated. The easiest would have been to simply back up all the files that they are seeking (if any) to USB, restore the computer to factor settings and hand it back to them. Issue resolved. But is this really a case of the former employer not knowing how to reformat a laptop?

    I'm assuming you set up the computer to have your login credentials and potentially used your private email for business too (perhaps) but haven't given access to the work product contained in your personal files. If there is important work product they need to access (and potentially your taking business to a successor employer) then perhaps the situation may get messy. Identifying the real source of the problem will be of great importance of finding a workable solution and assessing whether there may be a legal issue and the chances that legal action may be taken.
     
    hrforme likes this.

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