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Employer wants me to sign new contract for pay

Discussion in 'Employment Contracts & Work Policies' started by rorylane, Mar 6, 2019.

  1. rorylane

    rorylane Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
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    I accepted a job at a hospital. During the 6 week training, the hourly pay was supposed to be half of the regular pay. The training is being outsourced by the hospital to a completely different company.

    In the course of signing the contract with the company doing the training, the pay was stated to be the entire amount in the contract, not half as discussed with the hospital originally. We are two weeks in and the company wants me to sign a new contract that reduces the training pay to half (as I was originally told) AND take out the extra from the 2 weeks they paid me the full time salary. They admitted they made a mistake.

    Am I putting my employment in jeopardy by not signing the new agreement? The training pay vs the regular pay is a difference of about $3000.
     
  2. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Yes.

    Any time you say "no" to your employer you are putting your employment in jeopardy. When it comes to your "no" costing him thousands of dollars the decision to boot you out the door isn't that hard to make.

    Ask yourself how important this job is to you. Then make your choice.
     
    hrforme likes this.
  3. rorylane

    rorylane Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Adjusterjack-
    Thanks for the reply. Normally, I would 100% agree with you, but this is not my full time employer, which is where I thought this case may be a little different. They are just the company contracted to go through the initial training. They had no say-so in hiring me. The hospital hired them to train me and are being paid to do so. They made a mistake in the contract to me.

    The part that irritates me is they want to take back what they have already paid me. I really like the hospital, so in the end, I will not leave over this. I was just curious if they actually can do anything.

    I may be completely wrong here, and that is fine. I certainly do not confess to knowing the law that well (which is why I am here).
     
  4. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    The mouse versus lion principle:
    As a general rule, if a mouse disagrees with a lion, the mouse always loses.
     
  5. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Now I'm confused.

    Who is the contract with? You and the hospital? You and the training company? The hospital and the training company?

    Who is paying who? Does the hospital pay you? Does the training company pay you?

    Which contract is the issue?

    Stop using the word "they." It's plural and refers to everybody, which is where the confusion lies.

    Does your contract with the hospital specify a duration and require cause for termination?
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
  6. hrforme

    hrforme Active Member

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    even if they contract out, guess who is going to get stuck in the end? Probably your employer.

    Even if not, it shows a lack of character, because even you admit that "I accepted a job at a hospital. During the 6 week training, the hourly pay was supposed to be half of the regular pay." and "(as I was originally told)"...... did you not noticed or bring this to their attention at the time you signed the contract? "In the course of signing the contract with the company doing the training, the pay was stated to be the entire amount in the contract, not half as discussed with the hospital originally.".....That was the time to do so rather than profit off a KNOWN mistake.

    Whether legally you have to pay it back I can't say, but I will say that ethically you should. In the end you knew and accepted that you would be paid half of your regular pay.
     
    army judge likes this.
  7. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Excellent discussion about "ethics".

    In fact, it might have been done deliberately to "test" the ethics of potential recruits.

    If that is the case, it seems to be most effective.
     
    hrforme likes this.

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