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The use of Aliases on Email Marketing

Discussion in 'Internet & Social Media Law' started by Eddie123, Nov 21, 2018.

  1. Eddie123

    Eddie123 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Hello, I'm working on a drop-shipping online business that sells garden furniture and ornaments. I plan to reach my clients through having them opt-in to my email list, then start sending them informational emails.

    In these emails I will use text that I wrote, giving them garden information, then every few emails I will send them one that recommends them to add a certain item to their garden, then direct them to my online store.

    My question is: in my selling emails, the ones that are sort of an infomercial, what guidelines do I have to maintain in order to comply with the CAN-SPAM rules?

    Thank you.
     
  2. flyingron

    flyingron Member

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    Make sure only opted-in people get the message.
    Make sure the subject line matches the content.
    Make sure the return address is not obscured.
    Warn in the subject if there is adult content.

    Provide a clear unsubscribe mechanism at the bottom of the message.
    No empty messages.
    Provide your physical address.

    Make sure opt-out requests are handled timely.
     
  3. Eddie123

    Eddie123 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Okay, what about identifying an email that is recommending about a product then directing them to my store?
     
  4. flyingron

    flyingron Member

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    As long as it is clear that it is coming from your store, that the subject describes it as an advertisement rather than a neutral review, and you comply with all the stuff I described up there, you should be OK.

    If you're a pathetic scammer who is tricking people into thinking they're subscribing to an independent review, with thinly veiled spam, you can count on having your site blocked by all the major antispam engines, possibly your email and ISP accounts terminated, and then perhaps some action from the US FTC.
     
    army judge likes this.
  5. Eddie123

    Eddie123 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Okay. For the record, I am none of these things, that's why I'm asking legal questions.

    What if I'm sending a real review, with no intent of selling, then direct people to an Amazon reviews page through an affiliate link? Is that considered promotional? If yes, how do I write it in the subject?

    One more thing, could you please give me an example to a subject in a sells email, that talks about a specific product, and that is in compliance with the regulations?

    Thanks.
     
  6. Eddie123

    Eddie123 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I send emails with gardening information to people who signed-up to receive my newsletter. I also own an online store.
    If I identify myself, in those emails, by "a fake name" from "my store's real name", am I doing something illegal?
     
  7. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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  8. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    You're posting from Israel.

    No one on this site is an expert in Israeli law.
     

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