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Stealing Power

Discussion in 'Commercial Landlord & Tenant Issues' started by Shellygood, Jul 30, 2016.

  1. Shellygood

    Shellygood Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Hi. I just found out I have been paying to power a garage downstairs in addition to the power for my apartment for the past two years. I do not rent a garage but according to the manager, the way this community was built, the apartments share power with the garage however, this little detail was not disclosed anywhere in the lease. I always wondered why the hec my power bill was so damn high, like 300 for a 1,000 Sq ft place. That's nuts!
    After some investigating, turns out, the neighbor who rents the garage had a deep freezer in there. We ended up moving out 1 month early to get some reprieve on the power bill by turning all breakers to off but in doing so, we unknowingly spoiled all the food in the other neighbor's (garage owner) freezer.
    That neighbor complained to the office and get this, the manager told her they would not reimburse her and that they have been trying to keep the fact that the garage power is dependent on a particular apartment hush hush for over 20 years, wtf!

    My question is whether this is a criminal offense bc this has been going on for years and it affects potentially hundreds of people. The apartment community charges 90 bucks to rent a garage but steals power for it.
    Every lawyer I talk to tells me this is a small claim but this seems so much bigger. Why is this theft being taken so lightly?
     
  2. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Because it's not "theft" in the criminal sense. It's a civil matter, either in contract or tort.

    If you feel that the landlord has overcharged you for electric power because of the shared meter then you have a right to sue in small claims court for a refund.

    Are you willing to do that?
     
  3. Shellygood

    Shellygood Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Hi. Okay, this is helpful, thank you. Hec yeah, I am going to do that because this is bs. I have a letter that I am going to send them demanding a specific amount back to see where that gets me. I know I can sue in small claims court but I have no idea how to do that or where to start.
     
  4. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Small claims lawsuits are very easy to file.

    In your state, with its great sunshine laws, its even esaier because the state offers up very good tutorials online.

    Read this, and after you're done, Google "small calims lawsuit YOUR COUNTY, FL" for specific information on how to file in your county:

    Small Claims

    http://www.floridabar.org/TFB/TFBRe...EE8DCD85256B29004BFA62/$FILE/Small Claims.pdf

    Florida Small Claims Guide - Lawyers.com
     

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