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Son Fired without proof...

Discussion in 'Termination: Firing & Resignation' started by aspire123, Apr 16, 2002.

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  1. aspire123

    aspire123 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    My son is 17 and we live in Maryland. He was fired from his part time job on March 25. The company he worked for is claiming that my son stole money and property from them on 2 different occasions...Jan 20 2002 and March 24 2002. My son has been questioned by the police but not charged and no real proof has been shown that he was the culprit...Other people were on duty with him on the nights in question and he was not the last employee out of the building on either occasion. On the Jan 20 incident a large money machine dissappeared, when my son left work that night his supervisor is the one who let him out of the building and locked up behind him...He had no keys or access to security system. If my son took this machine weighing approximately 200 Lbs I would think someone would have noticed...Also on March 24 his supervisor let him out of building. Was the company right in firing him without facts and proof? My son has never been in trouble before. And is it safe to assume that since he has not been charged by the police that there is no proof that he was involved with these thefts?:confused: AIFILY2@aol.com
     
  2. Michael Wechsler

    Michael Wechsler Administrator Staff Member

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    It is possible to file a defamation claim against the company if its representatives had slandered or libeled your son. Your son could have been fired without cause if he was an "at will" employee, so that might be a difficult avenue to pursue. Note that in order to win on a defamation claim, you need to prove to a degree (probably to a degree more likely than not, 51%-49%) that the statement was false.
     

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