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Right To Live In Inherited Co-Op?

Discussion in 'Condo & Co-op Issues' started by MatthewNYC, Jun 26, 2020.

  1. MatthewNYC

    MatthewNYC Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
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    Hi,

    My parent's NYC co-op is currently in a trust. Upon my parents' deaths the trust dissolves and ownership transfers to myself and my siblings.

    I grew up in this apartment and currently live there part-time with my elderly mom.

    My question is when my parents are gone and I inherit the apartment what right, if any, do I have to live in the apartment?

    For example, must I still undergo a review by the board and be accepted or rejected by them?

    I'm wondering if I can continue living here or if the board has the right to kick me out and force me to sell the apartment?

    Please let me know the details.

    Thanks,

    Matthew
     
  2. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Assuming ownership actually transfers to you and your siblings, each of you would have the right to live there. Is there some reason why you'd think you might not have that right?

    That depends on the governing documents of the co-op, which, obviously, no one here is privy to.
     
  3. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    The ONLY way for you to receive a PRECISE answer to your query is to take the trust documents, co-op documents (including by-laws) to a real estate or estate attorney for evaluation.

    Your ultimate goal is to receive a written legal opinion regarding your desires upon the passing of your mother.

    Any answers you receive without the benefit of hiring an attorney are based upon supposition, conjecture, and speculation.
     

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