privilege to operate a motor vehicle

Danny Murphy

New Member
Does the phrase "privilege to operate a motor vehicle" have any meaning apart from it being associated with some driver license or permit? The phrase shows up in many jurisdictions but seems to really mean permission for a non-resident driver to use the roads in a state without getting that state's driver license.
 
Does the phrase "privilege to operate a motor vehicle" have any meaning apart from it being associated with some driver license or permit?

No.

The phrase shows up in many jurisdictions but seems to really mean permission for a non-resident driver to use the roads in a state without getting that state's driver license.

A licensed driver from any state in the US may drive in any other state in the US except that, upon becoming a resident of a state, he must obtain that state's driver license and title and register his vehicle.

Do an internet search for "sovereign citizen" and "right to travel" so you can see all the nonsense regarding those topics that are posted by ignorant trolls whose only intention is to create pages and pages of argument. We've seen plenty of that here and will shut it down quickly.
 
No.



A licensed driver from any state in the US may drive in any other state in the US except that, upon becoming a resident of a state, he must obtain that state's driver license and title and register his vehicle.

Do an internet search for "sovereign citizen" and "right to travel" so you can see all the nonsense regarding those topics that are posted by ignorant trolls whose only intention is to create pages and pages of argument. We've seen plenty of that here and will shut it down quickly.
OP's posting history leads me to believe that is where they are going with their threads.
 
Does the phrase "privilege to operate a motor vehicle" have any meaning apart from it being associated with some driver license or permit? The phrase shows up in many jurisdictions but seems to really mean permission for a non-resident driver to use the roads in a state without getting that state's driver license.

The phrase indicates that driving a motor vehicle on public roads is not a right. That means if the person wants to drive their car they need to meet the requirements that the state imposes: having a valid driver's license, having the vehicle properly titled, registered, and insured, and in some states the vehicle must also pass emissions tests and safety checks, too.

There are some folks out there who claim that operating a motor vehicle is a right and that as a result the person doesn't need a license, registration, insurance and all the rest. People who follow the sovereign citizen movement are among those who have that mistaken view of the law. And no matter how many times the courts tell those people that their sovereign citizen claims (or whatever other theory they are using to avoid the state law requirements) do not work and hit them with fines and other sanctions, others still persist in doing the same thing somehow thinking they will get a different result.

A famous quote states that "Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” The originator of that quote is not known; there are plenty of debates over the origin of it. But the saying itself has a lot of truth to it.

If John goes into court arguing the same thing that others before him got slapped down by the courts and were fined, jailed or otherwise punished for making illogical and frivolous claims that John now plans to argue in his case, what makes John think that he'll get a different result than everyone else who tried it before he did received for making the same arguments? It might not rise to insanity, but certainly John is not thinking logically in taking that course of action and thinking the he would somehow do better than those that went before him. The result ends up that John gets slapped down by the courts just like all the others that went down that same road before him.
 
Does the phrase "privilege to operate a motor vehicle" have any meaning apart from it being associated with some driver license or permit?

I don't know. You've quoted something without identifying what you're quoting or providing any context whatsoever.

If you want any sort of useful answer, you'll need to provide context.
 
But.... But ....what if they aren't driving? What if they are just traveling?

A person is free to walk wherever he wants on public sidewalks or other public land that is open for that purpose without the need for any license, take any tests, or register their feet with the state and get license plates for their feet. ;)

The right to travel that we all enjoy is not the same as a right to drive. Unfortunately some people don't understand the difference. Those who argue that the right to travel means they have a right to drive without a license, insurance, and vehicle registration are among those who don't have or don't apply logic skills to understand that difference. And that's why the people making those arguments lose in court over and over again. I know you know this very well, but there are some folks out there that need to get this drummed into their heads or they'll eventually have a pile of legal problems that will cost them a lot of money and maybe even time in jail or prison.
 
that's why the people making those arguments lose in court over and over again. I know you know this very well, but there are some folks out there that need to get this drummed into their heads or they'll eventually have a pile of legal problems that will cost them a lot of money and maybe even time in jail or prison.


Well said, thanks.

Have you ever been in a situation where you’re trying to explain something to someone and they just won’t get it? Perhaps your friend has a terrible boyfriend. Deep down, you can tell your friend knows it too, but they just won’t admit it.

It’s so frustrating, right?
There Are None So Blind as Those Who Will Not See – Meaning
“There are none so blind as those who will not see” refers to those who have full use of their eyesight but refuse to observe what’s right in front of them. They are thus more impaired than those who are literally blind. It refers to people’s attitudes and ignorance.

“There are none so blind as those who will not see” is a proverb that comes from scripture. It’s not a direct quote from the Bible but echoes a phrase found in the King James Bible or King James Version (KJV).

Jeremiah 5:21 reads:
Hear now this, O foolish people, without understanding; which have eyes, and see not; which have ears, and hear not.

It was writer John Heywood who said “there are none so blind as those who will not see” first. He wrote the quote in a form close to its current one in his 1546 book of proverbs:
Who is so deafe, or so blynde, as is hee, that wilfully will nother heare nor see.

https://grammarhow.com/there-are-none-so-blind/
 
Ummm... I was kidding :)

I know. But some of the people who have posted here wouldn't get it. Even after they read the explanation of why their beliefs are mistaken they still refuse to learn how things really are. Army Judge's post on those who are not blind but cannot see eloquently describes those folks.
 
Back
Top