1. Free Legal Help, Legal Forms and Lawyers. TheLaw.com has been providing free legal assistance online since 1995. Our most popular destinations for legal help are below. It only takes a minute to join our legal community!

    Dismiss Notice

Father's mother is married to sex offender

Discussion in 'Protective & Restraining Orders' started by cookiepilgrim, Oct 24, 2017.

  1. cookiepilgrim

    cookiepilgrim Law Topic Starter New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Jurisdiction:
    Tennessee
    Myself and My pregnant girlfriend just split up, and after agreeing that we needed to split up i brought up the fact that i can not deny my mother from seeing her grandchild, when said grandchild is born. My grilfriend, who has never met my mom, has refused to meet her because she is married to a registered sex offender, became very angry at this and told me she was going to put a restraining order on my mom to make sure she dosent come around the child. i understand that my mother has a poor lack of judgement, and that i would never bring my child around her husband, or any child for that matter, but can she really do that, put a restraining order on someone she has never talked to, or met face to face?
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

    Messages:
    30,593
    Likes Received:
    4,236
    Trophy Points:
    113

    Only a judge can issue a restraining order against a person.

    However, the woman you call friend, can go to court and request a judge issue such an order.

    Moreover, you aren't the father of the unborn baby.

    Only a married male can claim that honor.

    If you wish to potentially become the father, you must request a court to order a DNA test to prove your paternity.

    The state child support agency can also do that on your behalf.

    Once paternity is established, you can petition the court to allow you visitation.

    If it is revealed that convicted child molester lives with your mother, the court will issue an edict to keep the baby out of that home and the convicted pervert away from the child.

    Why on earth would you wish to take a baby or any child around a convicted Chimo?

    Visitation could potentially become overnights after three or four years.

    If the name of the Chimo is revealed, you might even get SUPERVISED visitations.

    So, there are many things that must happen for you to get at that child.

    One, it must be born alive.
    Once it has been born, you can then start the process to prove to the satisfaction of the court, that you are the father.
    Then visitation will be resolved, as well as child support.

    When the baby has been born, you can contact this agency and ask them to help you prove paternity, establish visitation, and child support.
    .
    .
    .
    .
    Establishing Paternity - TN.Gov
    .
    .
    .
    In Tennessee, paternity can be established either “voluntarily” or “involuntarily” until the child turns 21 years old.

    When the mother and father agree that the father is in fact the biological father, paternity can be established voluntarily. To voluntarily establish paternity, both the father and mother must sign what’s called a “Voluntary Acknowledgment of Paternity.”
    This is often done at the hospital when the child is born. The form can also be obtained and signed later at the child support office, local health department, or the Office of Vital Records. The mother and father must both sign the same form in front of a notary. Once signed and notarized, the Acknowledgment of Paternity must be filed with, or sent to, the Office of Vital Records. Once properly filed, the father is the legal father of the child and his name will be added to the child’s birth certificate.

    Involuntary establishment of paternity is done through a court proceeding where the court issues an “order of parentage.” This method is called “involuntary” because someone disputes paternity, which is why it becomes a court issue.
    You begin the court process by filing a “Petition to Establish Parentage” at a court located in the county where either the mother, father, or child lives. A number of people may file the petition: the mother, the father, the child (through a guardian), or the Tennessee Department of Human Services if the child is receiving public assistance.

    If either the mother or the father denies or is uncertain of paternity, the court may order DNA testing. Today, a DNA test requires that the child, mother, and father have the inside of their cheeks swabbed. The DNA is then sent to a laboratory for analysis. If, after DNA testing, the court determines that the father is in fact the biological father, the court will issue an order of parentage, making the father the legal father and his name will be added to the child’s birth certificate. Within the proceeding to determine paternity, the court can also issue orders of custody, visitation, and child support.
    .
    .
    .
     
  3. shrinkmaster

    shrinkmaster Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,674
    Likes Received:
    269
    Trophy Points:
    83
    You say she is a registered sex offender do you know the circumstances of that? Depending on the reason for status could weigh into whether or not she is allowed near child
     
  4. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

    Messages:
    7,921
    Likes Received:
    1,140
    Trophy Points:
    113

    There are multiple degrees of "sex offender" and not all of them are of danger to children. "Registered sex offender" does not automatically translate into "child molester" or even indicate that the offender has any interest in children.
     
  5. KatDini

    KatDini Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,212
    Likes Received:
    244
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I don't think that the Tennessee Child Support Enforcement Agency is going to help establish any visitation/custody orders - most will not touch that matter. The only state (to my knowledge) that might do something along those lines is Texas, and they present the state's standard orders.
     
  6. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,995
    Likes Received:
    607
    Trophy Points:
    113

    Only a court can issue a restraining order. Your ex-girlfriend obviously can ask the court to issue whatever order she wants. I think it is unlikely that most courts would issue an order prohibiting contact between your mother and the child, but an order prohibiting you from allowing the child to be in the presence of your stepfather and from leaving the child in your mother's care would be fairly likely. Of course, the devil is in the details, and not all RSOs are the same.
     
  7. leslie82

    leslie82 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,706
    Likes Received:
    216
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Until you establish paternity when the child is born you don't have any rights to that child as an unmarried male.

    She can file a restraining order against anyone she wants. Doesn't mean it gets granted...but if your mother is married to a registered sex offender she might get it.

    Why would you even want your child around a registered sex offender? Sorry if my mom were to yet again choose a man over her children and then grandchildren I would never let her near my kid. If anyone in my family married or dated a registered sex offender I wouldn't go around them.
     
  8. leslie82

    leslie82 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,706
    Likes Received:
    216
    Trophy Points:
    63
    He said that his stepfather is a registered sex offender...not his mother.
     

Share This Page