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DNA testing of a minor without the parents consent

Discussion in 'Paternity Law & DNA Tests' started by John Fromel, Aug 3, 2019.

  1. John Fromel

    John Fromel Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
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    While my ex and I were separated she submitted all three of my children's DNA to ancestry.com. She got a hit on my biological family (who I did not know previously). After identifying my biological family she proceeded to start a relationship with them. How do I get my kids DNA removed from any data bases they were submitted to? Did my ex commit a crime in submitting my kids DNA without my knowledge or concent?
     
  2. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    I'm not clear...If your ex the mother of the children or was she the step?
     
  3. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    You don't. You could ask them nicely, but don't expect much cooperation. The data belongs to them.

    No.
     
    hrforme likes this.
  4. John Fromel

    John Fromel Law Topic Starter New Member

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    My ex is the mother of the children.
     
  5. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    Okay...Well barring some strange restriction in the court order she did nothing wrong. The Data base you would need a court order to remove the results...if they even can. Obviously the people that were/are a "match" will have been notified and already have their info....so that horse left the barn. There really isn't anything you can do.
     
  6. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    If you are looking for something to get over on your ex with, you'll have to look elsewhere. Your ex did nothing wrong or illegal.
     
  7. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    A crime? You're asking if it's a CRIME for her to submit HER children's DNA if she wants to? That there's a law out there granting YOU all the power and making it a CRIME for her to do something involving HER children without YOUR permission? Brother, you need to get out more.
     
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  8. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    He's waiting for the skid marks on his knuckle's to heal...:p
     
  9. Tax Counsel

    Tax Counsel Well-Known Member

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    However, it should be a crime for anyone to send DNA of another to any private organization like ancestry.com without a court order/warrant or the consent of the adult person involved. It should never be permitted for minors without a court order. Submitting DNA info to these private companies can result in a lot of unwanted things in the future for the person whose DNA was submitted. That organization has very personal information and could use it for all kinds of purposes, some of which can have quite significant impacts on the person. Everyone ought to have control over their own DNA and be old enough to understand what that consent means before agreeing to having it sent to some data collecting site. This should include a prohibition on parents submitting their kid's DNA. Once the kids are adults they may be quite upset that their personal information was submitted to these organizations, and rightfully so.
     
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  10. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    What makes you think your kids' DNA was "submitted" to any database? Even if it was, why do you think you're entitled to override what your kids' mother did?

    You're free to contact the company to whom your ex submitted the DNA samples, but I suggest you read a few of these search results before doing so.

    No.
     

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