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Changing jurisdictional state

Discussion in 'Other Family Law Matters' started by Jennifer R McKenzie, Nov 6, 2019 at 9:05 AM.

  1. Jennifer R McKenzie

    Jennifer R McKenzie Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
    Florida
    My children have been in my custody temporarily since Jan. There is a case against the father in another state in dependency court. The state the father lives in, would like to close the dependency case and have Florida take jurisdiction and put a parenting plan in place.

    Not sure what to include in the filing and want to make sure I do this right the first time.
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    If you want something done correctly the first time, then don't DIY, hire a lawyer to do it on your behalf.

    What you desire isn't only up to you to decide.

    The father might not agree with your wishes.

    That's another reason you need a lawyer, not a discussion site.
     
  3. Jennifer R McKenzie

    Jennifer R McKenzie Law Topic Starter New Member

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    If I could afford one, then I would hire one. I have had to fight this on almost all my own power for two years. Trust me, I would rather not.

    I am petitioning the other state to give jurisdiction over to FL, because the father can not have a say in what happens to them, currently.

    Thank you for your concern over me doing this myself. No attorney has offered to take this pro bono, because they do not want to deal with it.
     
  4. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    What is the other state?
     
  5. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    Why not?

    Attorneys need to put food on the table...they're funny like that.
     
    justblue likes this.
  6. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Would you tell your employer, "Don't worry about it, boss, I love to work for free. In fact, I love ot so much, I'll work 80 hours this week for FREE, and 100 hours next week, for FREE!"

    Lawyers have bills, children to feed, a spouse to assist with family expenses, business partners that expect the lawyer to pay her/his way, etc...

    Lawyers also do pro bono work, faithfully.

    I'm retired, own a law firm, and every lawyer and paralegal employed by my law firm does pro bono work, too. None do it begrudgingly, because we understand and enjoy helping others when we can.

    I still do pro bono work, too.

    The ABA requires lawyers to do pro bono work.
    Lawyers take this charge seriously, and don't shirk their responsibilities to assist the public.

    Do plumbers, teachers, janitors, physicians, military personnel, police officers, painters, bus drivers, Uber drivers, or you name it; work for free?
    <========================>
    ABA Model Rule 6.1
    Voluntary Pro Bono Publico Service

    Every lawyer has a professional responsibility to provide legal services to those unable to pay. A lawyer should aspire to render at least (50) hours of pro bono publico legal services per year. In fulfilling this responsibility, the lawyer should:

    (a) provide a substantial majority of the (50) hours of legal services without fee or expectation of fee to:

    (1) persons of limited means or

    (2) charitable, religious, civic, community, governmental and educational organizations in matters which are designed primarily to address the needs of persons of limited means; and

    (b) provide any additional services through:

    (1) delivery of legal services at no fee or substantially reduced fee to individuals, groups or organizations seeking to secure or protect civil rights, civil liberties or public rights, or charitable, religious, civic, community, governmental and educational organizations in matters in furtherance of their organizational purposes, where the payment of standard legal fees would significantly deplete the organization's economic resources or would be otherwise inappropriate;

    (2) delivery of legal services at a substantially reduced fee to persons of limited means; or

    (3) participation in activities for improving the law, the legal system or the legal profession.

    In addition, a lawyer should voluntarily contribute financial support to organizations that provide legal services to persons of limited means.
     
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