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being sued for bite "injury" call homeonwer's insurance? Animal Injury, Dog Bite

Discussion in 'Accidents, Injuries, Negligence' started by chefdave, Apr 5, 2017.

  1. chefdave

    chefdave Law Topic Starter Guest

    Jurisdiction:
    Pennsylvania
    My dog, on a leashed walk, was accused of biting a Verizon worker while worker stood on the grassy area between the sidewalk and road, holding a "stop & go" sign for traffic.
    (I think she is technically to stand on the street and not the grass, but I'm not sure how to get that info.)
    Although we have differing stories, and claimed she was bitten.
    I told her I did not see my dog bite and that he sniffs everyone close by on walks.
    She tried to show me where, but there was no evidence of bite or tear in her pants.

    She stood around for 30 minutes or longer on the phone with her supervisor discussing her situation, while pacing back and forth until an ambulance arrived, that most likely came from across the street where the hospital is located. The evaluation by EMT said there was a bruise on her leg.
    No broken skin. No Blood.
    I only spoke to an officer.
    I took pictures of her walking around, talking on the phone, and stepping into the ambulance. She later refused the ambulance and walked to the E.R. across the street according to the police report.

    I received a letter from her attorney stating she had "personal injuries" and that I am to forward my homeowner's liability insurance.

    Question: Should I contact my homeowner's insurance directly?
    Should I speak to her lawyer directly?
    I believe she is lying, trying to beat the system, and looking for financial compensation for something or anything she can possibly find.
    My vet has cleared my pet for rabies after an exam.
    He has had no prior incidents.
    I do not have cash to pay her directly.
     
  2. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    You can check with homeowners insurance to see if they would even cover this, but since it apparently didn't happen at the home.... Probably not.
    Don't provide your insurance info or offer to pay anything.
    You aren't obligated to reply to the letter or do anything at all. Without an injury clearly attributed to a dog bite it is unlikely to go to court. Any costs should have been covered by workers comp.
     
  3. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Make this easy on yourself, report the matter to your homeowner's policy provider, your insurer.
    You pay your insurance company to cover you for these kinds of events.
    Reporting this to your insurer doesn't mean you admit guilt, or agree with what the other party says.
    It simply means that you your insurance company to protect you, look after your interests, which are also their interests.
    Allow the people who know how to deal with screamers, shysters, and con-artists to investigate on your behalf.

    This incident is your dog's first bite.
    Any more bites can be bigger trouble for you and the dog.
    Now you should research how you can be proactive to avoid additional problems, if there ever is a next time.

    In the meantime, contacting your vet was smart.

    Why?

    Pennsylvania imposes strict liability for all damages where the injuries are severe or the dog previously engaged in dangerous behavior.

    PA also imposes strict liability for medical bills even without bad behavior on the part of the dog or its owner.

    Victims can recover full compensation if the dog owner was negligent or violated an animal control law.
    ..
    ..
    Dog Bite Law in Pennsylvania
    ...
    ...
    Home
    ...
    ...
    After dog bite, state needs to step in
    ..
    ..
     
  4. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Absolutely, yes.

    Not necessary. Your insurance company will provide one if necessary.

    Your insurance company has the experts that know how to handle that.
     
  5. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Incorrect.

    The homeowners (or renters) insurance covers you away from home, too.

    Agree.

    True, but WC is entitled to subrogate against a negligent third party.
     

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