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A-team van

Discussion in 'Copyright, Trademark, Patent Law' started by wwsteel7, Apr 18, 2021.

  1. wwsteel7

    wwsteel7 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    If I were to make a movie that included a contemporary minivan vehicle (different than the original 1979 GMC model) with a paint job eerily similar to that of the original paint job or A-team movie (black or silver on top of red racing stripe on top of black), is that some type of infringement and not allowed legally?
     
  2. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    There are probably hundreds, maybe thousands of car hobbyists who have made replicas of the van, just like the Starsky and Hutch Torino, the General Lee, KITT, etc. Nobody says boo to that.

    But if you make a movie, whether you are infringing or not depends on the content of the movie - title, plot, etc.

    What's your movie going to be about?
     
  3. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    The reaction to your choice depends on many things.

    However, why not create your OWN, unique paint scheme?

    You appear to be confused as to what van year and model was used.

    The tv show premiered on January 23, 1983.

    The original 1983 GMC Vandura van used by the A-Team, with its characteristic red stripe, black and red turbine mag wheels, and rooftop spoiler, has become a pop culture icon.

    The customized 1994 Chevrolet G20 used in the 2010 A-Team movie was also on display at the 2010 New York International Auto Show.
     
  4. wwsteel7

    wwsteel7 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Its about the spiritual journey of the main character. But he gets in car accident along the way, gets minivan fixed and painted.

    The spiritual journey, it must be said in movie, is about going from point A to point b, then back to point A again.

    At no time in the movie though is it expressed verbally that the lead character is or part of the A-team. But with the aforementioned journey A-b-A, it is inferred that the character is part of A.
     
  5. wwsteel7

    wwsteel7 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    oh, I thought it was a 1979 Chevy.

    I dont want yet to invent my own paint job, I want to be able to legally infer the connection of A-team and character
     
  6. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    That MIGHT get the owners of any intellectual property protections to take notice of your work as misusing, abusing, ignoring their protections.

    I suggest you speak to a solicitor or attorney in the nation where you reside for specific guidance, and NOT rely on information harvested off the 'net BEFORE you proceed!
     
  7. wwsteel7

    wwsteel7 Law Topic Starter New Member

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  8. wwsteel7

    wwsteel7 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    or, what if the stripe was reversed in direction and colors were different?
    Not looking like A-team much at all
     
  9. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    From my point of view, your premise seems to agree with a philosophy I've held most of my life.

    No matter how long we live, what we do, where life has taken us, we never veer too far off the course we set for ourselves early on in life.

    that is to say, most of us retain the values and moral compass with which we started with in our lives.

    We venture off course once in a while, yet like those mariners of the 16th, 17th, and later centuries; we always end up back on course.

    Your plot has merit, and I'd certainly be willing to view your work.

    Just don't allow the look of your work to outshine the depth of your idea and it's premise.

    The plot is what gets me to watch a movie, not the theatrics and the scenery.
     
  10. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    That ploy has often been attempted, albeit without much success.

    In fact, what you describe might be considered plagiarism if we were looking solely at the written word.
     
  11. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    That's where you could get into big, expensive trouble.

    If you want to do it, you'll need consent of the producers and you might have to pay a licensing fee. If you don't want to do that then don't relate your character to the A-Team.

    Frankly, if you can't write a screen play without using somebody else's gimmick, you should probably abandon the idea.

    If you want a vehicle to be a character in your movie, create your own unique take on it like many have done before you.
     
  12. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    If this is just some crappy home movie, no one connected with the original project will care. If it's something that's intended to be released in theaters, it will be vetted by a about a dozen attorneys, so you needn't concern yourself with it.

    So...you want to make your job easier and want to be derivative of someone else's intellectual property?
     
  13. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    The A-Team never used a "minivan". It was a full-sized van.
     
    army judge likes this.

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