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Want dual citizenship Naturalization, Citizenship

Discussion in 'Green Card, Residency, Naturalization' started by clhatt1111, Jul 3, 2005.

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  1. clhatt1111

    clhatt1111 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    My mother was born in Canada in 1957, and moved to the U.S. around 1966. At that time, she obtained a green card. She has lived in the U.S. ever since. She married my father, American, in 1978. She never filed any legal documents. At this point, I would like to get dual citizenship, but I don't think her status will allow me to obtain it. Does she need to update her green card, apply for dual, or just apply for residency? She has lived in the U.S. for almost forty years!
     
  2. NYClex

    NYClex New Member

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    where were you born, when, and is the American your mother married your biological father? Which citizenship do you hold now?
     
  3. clhatt1111

    clhatt1111 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I was born in Massachusetts in 1982. My mother was born in Canada, moved to the U.S. in the 60s with a green card, married to my biological father in 1978. I have U.S. citizenship only.
     
  4. NYClex

    NYClex New Member

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    Hm, your mother's legal status in the US has nothing to do with your possible Canadian citizenship. If she has an American green card, she has a residency permit. She should, of course, always renew her actual green card.

    You received American citizenship because you were born on American soil.

    Therefore you would have to find out about Candian citizenship law. I am not an expert in Canadian law, but according to the official website of the Canadian government you are actually a Canadian citizen if you were born outside of Canada but to at least one Canadian parent after Feb 14, 1977. So all you would need to do is register your citizenship with a Canadian consulate or embassy (there are some different rules for chldren of Canadian citizens who themselves were not born in Canada).

    http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/citizen/bornout-info.html
     

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