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Wage Garnishment(Two Jobs) Garnishment

Discussion in 'Other Debt, Collection, Garnishment' started by plainhat, Jul 6, 2014.

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  1. plainhat

    plainhat Law Topic Starter New Member

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    According to the law in my state, when dealing with medical bills, your paycheck can't be garnished more than 25%, and only if it's more than $217.50(after taxes).

    But it doesn't say anything about having two jobs.

    If you have two jobs with two seperate companies, is each job garnished seperately or are they added together, then garnished?

    Example A(Seperate)

    Job 1 - $250/week(gross) minus $32.50 = $217.50

    Job 2 - $250/week(gross) minus $32.50 = $217.50

    Total - $65.00/week garnished

    Example B(Together)

    Job 1 + Job 2 = $500/week(gross) minus 25% = $375.

    Total - $125.00/week garnished.
     
  2. plainhat

    plainhat Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I meant "net", not "gross".

    Let's assume the creditor knows about both jobs.
     
  3. disagreeable

    disagreeable Well-Known Member

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    Your math is wrong. $250 * 25% = $62.50
     
  4. plainhat

    plainhat Law Topic Starter New Member

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    According to federal law, your paycheck can't be garnished below $217.50.

    $32.50 is the most they can take before hitting the minimum.
     
  5. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Yeah, that must suck. In Texas and other states, too, they can't attach your wages.
    Only the IRS can steal from a citizen's wages, and some other gubmint agencies.
    But, if you had no debt, no one could steal from you.
     
  6. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    If you have two jobs with two separate companies, you have two separate paychecks and each can be garnished. The two companies are not required to have their payroll departments compare notes and add your paychecks together.

    That should be obvious.
     
  7. plainhat

    plainhat Law Topic Starter New Member

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    That's what I thought, but wasn't sure.

    So that means each paycheck can't be garnished below the federal minimum of $217.50?
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2014
  8. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    Each paycheck is subject to the law, but each paycheck can be garnished to the extent of the garnishment presented to them.
     
  9. plainhat

    plainhat Law Topic Starter New Member

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    From what I understand, regardless of how many jobs someone has, the paychecks/jobs are not added together then garnished, they are garnished separately.

    Each paycheck cannot be garnished less than the federal minimum of $217.50.

    "When you have two jobs, such as a full-time job during the week and a part-time one on the weekends, expect garnishments from both paychecks. The pay isn't lumped together, however; federal guidelines impose a percentage limit per job, not for your total disposable income. (ref. 1) That means that if you're expecting a 25 percent garnishment, then 25 percent will come out of each paycheck from both jobs rather than taking 25 percent of your total income out of one paycheck. For example, if you bring home $800 per week from your full-time job and $300 per week from your part-time job, you'll lose 25 percent of both the $800 and the $300. In this scenario, you lose the same amount you would if your take-home pay from one job was $1,100. But if you make $250 per week at your part-time job, the creditor can only take a smaller amount to ensure that paycheck equals $217.50 per week, the minimum required by federal law. Instead of losing 25 percent, or $62.50, you'll lose $32.50."
     
  10. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    That is correct. I believe, in fact, that's what I said. So what's the problem, and why are you all over the internet with this?

    Pay your bills and no one will have to garnish you.
     
  11. plainhat

    plainhat Law Topic Starter New Member

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    You weren't specific enough.

    I am "all over the internet with this", because I keep getting contradicting answers from people that don't know what they're talking about.

    I wouldn't have to keep asking, if the only people that answered were experts at the law, and not a bunch of people just guessing.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2014
  12. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    I don't see that the answers you've been given are contradictory.

    Tell me, what answer is it that you are looking for that you haven't been given?
     
  13. plainhat

    plainhat Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I answered you on expertlaw...
     
  14. plainhat

    plainhat Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Questions answered.

    Thanks....
     
  15. Betty3

    Betty3 Super Moderator

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    In the OP's defense - sometimes it is hard/not possible (even with health ins.) to pay medical bills all at once. They just don't have the income/money.
     
  16. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    That much is understood, but by the time it gets to a garnishment it's usually gone beyond just "I don't have the money but will pay when I do" and has reached the point of "I haven't cooperated with any attempts to set up a payment plan or made any partial payments so the only way my creditors are ever going to get their money is by taking it out of my paycheck before I even see it"
     
  17. Betty3

    Betty3 Super Moderator

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    That's true "sometimes" too. (though "sometimes" creditor(s) will not accept as enough the amount the person can pay/is able to pay in a payment plan) We don't know anything about OP's situation so can't really say.
     

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