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State provided insurance

Discussion in 'Other Family Law Matters' started by OutThere, Nov 5, 2020.

  1. OutThere

    OutThere Law Topic Starter New Member

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    hi My sister and nephew b/c of their income they receive state sponsored health insurance. I have a fairly well paying job. if i moved in with them the household income would go up and they would not be eligible......right? would i have to pay for their healthcare? Actually its not paying the plan premiums , it's paying the deductible of say medical costs that the insurance does not cover .
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2020
  2. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    That's how it works.

    https://www.marylandhealthconnection.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/MHC_Factsheet_Medicaid.pdf

    I'm not sure what you are asking there. If you lived with them and your income drove the household income above the limit then there would be no insurance and somebody would have to pay the medical bills.
     
  3. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    I disagree a bit with adjusterjack's answer. If you move in as a roommate, including paying rent and maintaining your own food, etc., then you might be excluded from the calculation for the size of her household. You would need to carefully study how a "household" is defined. Of course, the additional income your rent provides may cause problems, which is something else that would need to be considered.
     
  4. Paddywakk

    Paddywakk New Member

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    It's been my experience, working with college/university students with such insurance, that all income for all persons living in the home must be included, related or not.

    But I agree the OP should check on how the state defines a "household"
     
  5. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    I've had the opposite experience. Of course, it is difficult to follow all of the "rules" to maintain a separate household. For example, in the situation I am aware of, there were separate labeled shelves in the pantry, refrigerator, and storage cabinets, and the roommate had to pay a percentage of every utility bill. This all had to be completely documented.
     
  6. Paddywakk

    Paddywakk New Member

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    Yes, the rules could vary state to state, and possibly the sister's income won't be counted. Because they are related, it could very well be. Best for the two to know what to expect.
     
  7. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    That would be an excellent question to direct to the agency that provides the insurance.

    Unless you specifically agree to be liable for a particular bill or series of bills, you would not have any liability to pay their medical bills just because you move in with them.

    Probably not relevant, but why are you considering moving in with them?
     
  8. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Pay rent as a tenant and you increase the income of the individual. Be a cohabitant and you increase the income of the household.

    Catch 22.
     
  9. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    Yep very true.
    In the situation I am referring to it was different because the landlords weren't on any form of state assistance.
     

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