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Scammed by a used car dealer.

Discussion in 'Car Sales, Dealers, Repairs, Lemon Law' started by Keyan, Aug 25, 2021.

  1. Keyan

    Keyan Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
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    I bought a 2005 Ford Truck on 8-18-2021 from a used car dealer in Marietta, GA. All of the vehicles are as is - with all faults.

    It was my first time buying a car, I checked it for basic issues like fluids, rust, noise, etc. Driving home I noticed shuddering, had a mechanic diagnose it, found out the engine mounts, breaks and rotors, transmission, and a few other small things were faulty.

    I called the dealer the next day and they refused to do anything about it. I ended up paying to fix the issues and now I have to deal with the transmission which is going to potentially be another $4000. The website lists safety checks and maintenance, the dealer assured me the vehicle was in good condition, they knew I was a first time buyer, and apparently they have sold similar vehicles to several other people.

    I don't see how misleading or blanket statements can be used when it puts the consumers life and those around them at risk; when I saw "as is" I thought worn brakes, tires, less time before a problem arose; I never thought the vehicle was dangerous when I drove it off the lot.

    If anyone thinks there is any way to challenge this feel free to ask more questions to make a determination, there is no reason auto dealers should be legally allowed to omit life threatening faults.

    If your response is that I got scammed and learned a lesson, that's fine. Ultimately I'd like to try to get compensation for the repairs, the danger the vehicle presented, and maybe put a stop to the unethical conduct of the dealer.
     
  2. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    Georgia's Lemon Law only applies to new cars. Next time you buy a car have your own mechanic check it out.

    The Georgia Lemon Law
     
  3. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    Saying a car is in "good condition" is usually considered "puffery" (look it up). Did you receive any specific warranty about the vehicle, or were you told of any specific items that were "new", etc.?

    To address your statement in the last paragraph: You won't get compensation for any "danger", nor is it likely that you're going to affect the behavior of the dealer.
     
  4. PayrollHRGuy

    PayrollHRGuy Well-Known Member

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    This is why you test drive and have a mechanic you trust check the car BEFORE you buy,

    Why would you think that? "as is" may be one the clearest legal terms out there.
     
  5. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    I don't have anything to say about this yet, but I'm just going to quote it here because it's the most important thing in your post.

    Because it was sold to you "as is."

    Not really sure what this means.

    Assured you how? What does "good condition" mean? And you bought the car "as is" anyway, and I'm sure that part was in writing, and I'd bet it contains a disclaimer of both express and implied warranties.

    A fact that presumably could have been discovered before you bought the car by doing the same research that you presumably didn't do until after you bought the car. Right?

    Did you test drive it before buying it?

    I'm not sure I even think you got scammed. It seems like you failed to do even the most basic of research before buying (especially if you didn't test drive the vehicle), and I'm guessing there were fairly obvious signs that this wasn't a particularly reputable dealer.
     
  6. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    How much did you pay for it?

    How many mile on it when you bought it?
     
  7. Keyan

    Keyan Law Topic Starter New Member

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    It was 10,000 with 135,000 miles. In response to the other replies the dealer still omitted the faults present and could have easily listed them and or dropped the price to get a sale anyway, in my opinion it's unethical.
     
  8. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    Used car dealer are , quite often, unethical. Consider this an expensive lesson and next time you buy a used car have your own mechanic inspect it. Also check out the dealers reputation.
     
  9. welkin

    welkin Active Member

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    Georgia used car dealers have to obtain a license from both the state and local community. Check out their license and complain to the proper authorities.
     
  10. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    I'm guessing you're fairly young, but have you ever seen anyone trying to sell someone who listed defects with the product in advertising?

    Why do that when it was able to sell it to you for the $10k price? Why on Earth would the dealer do that?

    Subjective notions of "ethics" are meaningless. All that matters is whether a law was violated. You can, of course, take your paperwork to a local attorney for review and advice, but don't hold your breath. It's your job to look out for your best interests. It's absolutely not the job of the person with whom you're doing business to do that.
     

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