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Posing as a minors parent to sign a waiver Other Criminal Charges & Offenses

Discussion in 'Criminal Charges' started by Fujiman288, Sep 30, 2022.

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  1. Fujiman288

    Fujiman288 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
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    Here's the deal:

    I am watching my cousin, age 10, through the weekend, while her parents are out of town.

    Her birthday way last week, and as we knew in advance this trip was coming, my gift for her Big 10 is to take her on a hot air balloon ride on Sunday, and she is extremely excited about it.

    Unfortunately, I just now looked at the rules and regulations, and I should have thought about something like this, but I see now that a waiver has to be filled out and,in case of a minor, the parent or legal guardian has to be present during the ride.

    This is the only hot air ballooning place in the area, and I emailed them anonymously from a different email and they confirmed, yes, parent or COURT APPOINTED legal guardian must be there, in person, in the basket, per their company policy.

    But this got me thinking: She's 10, I'm 29. The 19 year age difference is sufficient to believably be her parent.

    So as it's not like me to break a promise to a child, what if I just fill out the form myself, listing her as my daughter?

    Could that work? And is there any way I could get caught and any consequences?

    Afterall, how do they know I'm not her dad?
     
  2. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Maybe they won't.

    But they will certainly find out when something bad happens, like she falls out of the balloon and gets killed. So will her parents. So will the cops. And you'll be in crap city for a long long time.

    It's really an incredibly stupid idea.

    On a stupidity scale of 1 to 10, you're so far off the scale, you broke it.

    Why don't you email the parents the form, have them sign it and email it back to you?

    Do they even know that you are planning this excursion? Will they consent? Or will they slap the shit out of you for even thinking about it?

    You had no business making that promise without talking to her parents first. Now you get to teach her that stupid adults break promises.
     
    Red Kayak and justblue like this.
  3. Fujiman288

    Fujiman288 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    A few things:

    Yes, her parents absolutely know about the hot air balloon ride. Its just that at the time, we didn't know about the waiver.

    Why can't I email the waiver to them and they send it back? I mentioned why in the OP. Because per their company policy, parent or COURT APPOINTED legal guardian must actually be there. And this info comes from the gentleman who is both the pilot and the owner of the company.

    Third, I'm sure any activity where something bad could happen has the possibility of having a waiver, but as far as falling out of the balloon?

    I figure that if something that dramatic is going to happen, then it's not really a result of who signed the waiver.

    But this company does hundreds of rides per year with up to ten people in the balloon. Such accidents are so rare that they make the news. This particular place has operated since 1988 with no word of such a thing ever occuring. And it's not like I'm gonna let her go and lean over the basket. I'd pull her back before she could even get close.

    To be clear, it's not that I didn't consider this. But with all things considered, I think she has a better chance of dying in a car crash on the way over there than she does on the balloon ride.
     
  4. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    You might not be challenged.

    However, that'll be the least of your worries, God forbid ANYTHING goes awry!!!

    Okay, mate, what if the balloon deflates?

    What if people are seriously injured or killed?

    What the heck is "getting caught" contrasted with a child being paralyzed or killed?

    When your devilish, foolish little ploy is uncovered, what will you say and do?

    No need to respond, just food for thought, mate.

    When her real father and mother arrive to identify the body, the cat will escape the bag.

    Attach3672_20220930_185205.gif

    Oh what a tangled web we weave/When first we practice to deceive.
     
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  5. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Well I don't blame him for that policy. He's covering his own butt with that requirement.

    Then postpone it until her parents are back so they can sign the waiver.

    Maybe they'll want to go up in the balloon and make it a family outing.
     
    hrforme likes this.
  6. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    If there is one thing I've learned from a lifetime in the insurance busines is that bad things happen when people take stupid risks.

    You're not going to get any approval from anybody here.

    And with that I'm locking the thread.
     
    hrforme likes this.
  7. Fujiman288

    Fujiman288 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I watched my ten year old cousin over the weekend, and will be watching her again over her Thanksgiving break from school when her parents are out of town.

    They gave me one of those boilerplate forms and filled it out, granting me temporary authority to authorize medical care for her in case the need arises.

    But I got to thinking, does it need to be notorized?

    Because if it's not, then I figure that anyone could print up such a form and sign someone else's name.

    So 2 questions.

    1. What needs to be included for hospitals or doctors offices to accept that?

    2. If there were such an issue and I hadn't had something that would suffice, could I just say I'm her dad? How would they know?
     
  8. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    If you need to take her to the ER they will treat her...The Doctors will likely call the parents for any consent needed. Do not lie.
     
  9. Fujiman288

    Fujiman288 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    My understanding was in the case of a minor without a parent present (0r an adult with such a form) that the hospital will provide lifesaving care, stabilizing care, and an assessment to see if either of those things are neccesary, but that they won't do anything else that could be beneficial until a parent or guardian gets there.

    Kind of like uninsured patients, such as if a homeless guy comes into the ER having a heart attack, then they'll save him if they can, but he's probably not getting the red carpet rolled out for him.

    Perhaps I'm mistaken, but if so, then what's the point of those authorization forms?

    And how to they know that the person they are talking to on the phone is the really parent, any more than they know the person who is there with the child is the parent?
     
  10. leslie82

    leslie82 Well-Known Member

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    I know when my child stayed with my family when I had to go away for military training I did a power of attorney so they could make decisions while I was gone. And the hospital had their own authorization form I had to sign and I'm pretty sure that I had to notarize as well as the power of attorney. But I left her with them almost 2 months. For a weekend thing, I'm not sure but it wouldn't hurt to have something notarized.

    No don't lie and say you're a parent. Smh.
     
    justblue likes this.

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