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Name differs on social security card and birth certificate

Discussion in 'Social Security, Disability & Health' started by AllisonJC, Jan 3, 2020.

  1. AllisonJC

    AllisonJC Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I was born in Cuba in 1957 under the name Marianela but when we came to the US as a child, my father listed my nickname "Nellie" on my social security card. I am now trying to obtain Medicaid but can't prove my identity because I don't have a driver's license or passport. How can I rectify this if I can't prove my true identity? I was married (can't locate my marriage license) and have 2 children if this helps at all.
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Over the last 63 odd years of your life, how many years have you lived in the USA?

    If you arrived in the USA from Cuba, you were welcomed by the US Government, in fact you were given preferential immigration status and documents.

    Disregarding a familial "nickname", your arrival on US soil was memorialized by US Immigration and Naturalization Services and/or US Customs, US Border Patrol, as well as several other US and state government entities.

    You certainly attended some US school system, obtained a social security card, and numerous other documents.

    If you have no recollection of such documents, you might wish to reconsider your strategy.

    There are ways the government uses to ensnare those who attempt to enter the US illegally.

    If your story is true, it will be very easy to PROVE you are in the USA legally, having arrived as welcomed Cuban refugees.
     
  3. AllisonJC

    AllisonJC Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I have been in the US since 1959. You are correct, I attended school here, worked most of my life here, paid taxes here, got married here and obtained a non-photo driver's license as a teenager. This is not about proving that I am a citizen but that I am one person since my birth certificate (Marianela) and SS card (Nellie) lists different names. I was married under Nellie as well but now can't obtain a copy of my marriage license because they too are asking for proof that I am the same person.

    I am looking for advice on how to move forward. Should I legally change my name to the name on my social security card? Should I seek the assistance of a lawyer? Can the social security administration help me directly?

    Appreciate your input.
     
  4. AllisonJC

    AllisonJC Law Topic Starter New Member

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    FYI - I made mention of being born in Cuba so that those that may be able to provide guidance understands that my birth certificate is from another country. I assume this makes the situation different than a person that was born in let's say, NJ.
     
  5. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    In what state were you married? There's a reason I'm asking.
     
  6. AllisonJC

    AllisonJC Law Topic Starter New Member

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    New Jersey
     
  7. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    I don't know if this will work in NJ, but in MA I can get a copy of my marriage certificate at the town hall of the town where I was living at the time of my marriage, rather than going to City Hall in Boston (which I can also do, but takes longer). It's worth a try.
     
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  8. flyingron

    flyingron Active Member

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    Take all your documentation to your local social security office. They can fix your social secuirty card to match the birth certificate.
     
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  9. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    The only difference is that official documents issued in foreign countries bear an apostille.

    An Apostille is the name for a specialized certificate, issued by a state's Secretary of State, or the US Secretary of State.

    The Apostille is attached to your original document to verify it is legitimate and authentic so it will be accepted by countries who are members of the Hague Apostille Convention.

    Very often local law states “no document shall be accepted having foreign language that is not translated into English” trumps/contravenes the Hague convention and an apostille instrument.

    You attach the translation of the apostille to your original (or certified) document.
     
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