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Intellectual property waiver from an employer

Discussion in 'Copyright, Trademark, Patent Law' started by AlexanderKeller, Dec 9, 2019.

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  1. AlexanderKeller

    AlexanderKeller Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Hello,

    I am employed by a big consulting firm, and in my free time I develop games. I am now planning to found a company and start selling them, while staying full time employed with my day job.

    I was wondering how I should ask my employer for a waiver of intellectual property for these games. In particular, who has the legal authority to grant such a waiver for it to be legally binding for the company? My manager? Maybe HR?

    I am based in Germany, but I need this waiver to be valid worldwide, so my question applies to other jurisdictions as well (including the US).

    Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you very much in advance.
    Alexander
     
  2. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    These boards are for issues of U.S. law only.

    I'm at a loss as to why you would think anyone here would know who the appropriate person(s) is/are at your unknown employer and how you should approach one of those persons.

    If you and your employer are in Germany and the agreement is made in Germany, then only German law is relevant.
     
  3. Michael Wechsler

    Michael Wechsler Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm unsure what you are seeking. If you are developing a product on your free time, it's your product. My guess is that you're trying to ensure that your employer won't make a claim on your work which, in some manner, might be related to what you are doing for them. Hence you want your employer to "waive" all right and claim on the product you're pursuing privately. You may want to speak to an intellectual property attorney if there is a legitimately important issue and possibility of a challenge to your intellectual property rights. I would hesitate from assuming that your employer is going to be enthusiastic about supporting your private successes. Best of luck.
     

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