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Injury on School Property Premises Liability

Discussion in 'Accidents, Injuries, Negligence' started by DDil, Sep 13, 2019.

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  1. Michael Wechsler

    Michael Wechsler Administrator Staff Member

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    The time limit can be very strict. Here in New York it's a 90 day notice of claim against the city.
    Correction, thank you. Grandchild! Still the same concern.
     
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  2. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    So hit with a yoga ball when not looking, and which should not have reasonably been thrown....
    Have you considered asking the other child's parents to pay the damages their child caused?
     
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  3. DDil

    DDil Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I thought Property owners (school districts included) all carry trip and fall coverage? ( If someone falls on my property, my homeowners insurance is supposed to cover claim)




    Yes, correct, not much in big scheme of things , but probably a lifelong expense of tooth replacements, treatments, diagnostic tests, etc.

    Ty again for taking the time to reply!

    No


    >Thank you for your info. Will pursue methods suggested. -(Main concern is ongoing cost for several years and/or lifetime related to childhood permanent front teeth injury.)




    No
     
  4. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    If someone falls on your property because of something that you did (or did not do), then yes. However, let's say that your friend Sally walked in to your house and accidentally dropped her banana peel, then, 2 seconds later, your friend Bob walks in and slips on the peel, falls, and hits the floor, causing a concussion. Why would you be responsible for that?
     
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  5. PayrollHRGuy

    PayrollHRGuy Well-Known Member

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    Just because there was no organized game doesn't mean the ball "should not have reasonably been thrown".
     
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  6. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Mythbusters addressed the banana peel issue. It seems unlikely that a person could slip on just one banana peel but look what happens when there are lots of banana peels.

     
  7. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    By the description given I was under the impression the kid was deliberately beaned by another goofing off. OP then said it wasn't even deliberate, so that pretty much changes everything
     
  8. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    LOL

    I guess I forgot to mention that the banana peel had larvae from an as-yet undiscovered species of microscopic creature that secretes pure WD-40.

    (It IS my hypothetical scenario after all ;) )
     
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  9. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    I'm guessing you don't have much of a grasp of how property owner's policies work. There's no such thing as "trip and fall coverage." As I explained in my prior response, it's possible that the relevant insurance policy contains a provision for payment of some amount (commonly $5-10k) for injuries suffered on the premises regardless of liability. It's also possible that this won't be the case here since the school may be self-insured or have different coverage than a normal commercial entity. Absent coverage of that sort, the child's parents will have to prove that the injuries resulted from someone else's negligence, and only then would the property owner's insurer step in to indemnify the property owner.

    I note, by the way, that you ignored my inquiry about the child's parents' personal medical/dental coverage.
     
  10. DDil

    DDil Law Topic Starter New Member

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    zdd

    Thank you for info. From what I have read thus far, It does not sound hopeful for premise liability since it was an accident on public school property. Also Summer Camp admin (run by the Township) will not release name of child who threw ball that caused accident.

    From the info shared on this thread, I was trying to find out possibility of a case before I encourage my daughter to contact an atty.

    She is busy with a new job and family so I’m trying to research this info. for her.

    At time of accident this past summer, their dental insurance was under her previous employer (which may or may not cover ‘some’ of expenses to date).

    My concern is ongoing expense for “continued” dental problems associated with this accident. (could be many years of caps, bonding, implants, diagnostics, etc.).

    I will share this helpful info with her. My grandson is okay in the grand scheme of things but continues dental care and X-rays (related to this injury) every few weeks! Thank you for your time.
     
  11. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Based on what you've described, the school where the injury occurred almost certainly has no liability (although, as indicated, there may be "no fault" insurance coverage), and the entity operating the camp likely has no liability (either because of a lack of provable negligence or a liability waiver or both). As for the parents of the other kid, here's a summary of Pennsylvania parental liability law. Take particular note of a couple things. First, it appears liability is capped at $1k. Second, your daughter would have to prove that the injury resulted from the other child's negligent or willful conduct beyond what would normally be part of the accepted risk of a bunch of 10-year olds playing together. Under the circumstances, that would be virtually impossible to prove.
     
  12. DDil

    DDil Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Okay thank you
     

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