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HIDING A REPO IN A DIFFERENT STATE

Discussion in 'Auto Loans & Vehicle Repossession' started by gemimiwitch77, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. gemimiwitch77

    gemimiwitch77 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Good evening. I have continuously searched for some info on this question, and couldn't find it. My daughter has been in need of a vehicle, so out of the blue, her fiancee's mother announced that she could have her Trailblazer. I need to let you know that this person mistreats her son as well as my daughter, and she never offers a thing for them. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia and we are located in Charlotte, N. C. She then mentions to them that she is behind on the payments and the repo man has been around looking for it. I feel if an officer had to pull my daughter over, things would go down from there. She'd be guilty of concealment, removing the vehicle from Atlanta, as well as reducing the value of the of the vehicle, since she'd be taking her daughter to her doctor's appointments. Can you tell me of any other laws she would break if she drives it? From my understanding, the registration wouldn't be in her name anyways. I believe the woman that gifted it to her, is the type that'd report it stolen, just out of meanness. Thank you so much for your time, and if there's any information you can give me, please do. Thanks again!!!
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    If your daughter fears trouble by using the vehicle, the smart play is to politely decline.
     
    hrforme likes this.
  3. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    I'm curious why you think this is information we "need" to have.

    You mean a cop? Cops don't typically know or care about the status of vehicle loans.

    Not quite sure why you believe any of this.

    I can't think of any laws (not just "any other" laws) that your daughter would break if she were to drive the car in question.

    That's a whole different issue. Does your daughter share your feelings about her fiance's mother?

    Aside from the possibility of a false police report, the only real risk of what you've described is that the vehicle will be repossessed. Both of these things would seem to counsel against your daughter taking possession of and using the vehicle under the circumstances described.
     
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  4. txls

    txls Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion it's never a good idea to take possession of and drive a vehicle that is in someone else's name. For many reasons, but one is that daughter will have no way of knowing if the lady maintains insurance, and if she does, will daughter be covered? Daughter should say no thanks.
     
    hrforme likes this.
  5. Michael M. Wechsler

    Michael M. Wechsler Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm guessing the comment about "mistreatment" has to do with inferring that this gesture may not be one of total beneficence. In essence, this is about driving a car which could be repossessed at any time. Are there any laws that are being broken? Is this concealment? It appears that everyone knows the facts and circumstances behind this "gift" or "permanent loan" of the vehicle.

    I'd be more practical in analyzing the issues. The moment your daughter has one incident, perhaps a traffic accident, there may be trouble - especially if there is a personal injury. The insurance question is substantial and important. And if there is a larger accident that may involve an investigation and discovery, it certainly will not cast a positive light upon your daughter. Personal injury accidents, regardless of extent, are usually not easily disposed.

    So to get back to your question, are any laws being broken by "borrowing" the vehicle - maybe. But even assuming that she wouldn't be criminally charged, the likelihood of civil liability is one which she should seriously consider. As was suggested earlier, politely declining a gift or offer of a loan is an option available to her.
     
  6. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Well...it's the driver's responsibility to ensure that proper insurance coverage is in place. The OP's daughter certainly can ask her fiance's mother for evidence of insurance coverage and, if she can't get such evidence, the onus is on the daughter to obtain proper coverage.
     
  7. txls

    txls Well-Known Member

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    Even if the mother shows evidence of current insurance, she won't know if it gets cancelled. Not sure if daughter can get insurance on a vehicle she doesn't own. It's just a mess and not worth taking chances.
     
  8. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Liability insurance covers the driver. A person does not need to own a vehicle to obtain mandatory liability insurance.
     
  9. txls

    txls Well-Known Member

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    Sure, but if she wrecks the car then she and the owner are going to be fighting over who fixes it.
    Or it doesn't get fixed, then it gets repo'd, then the owner owes the bank even more... messy, messy.
     
  10. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    True. But, from an underwriting standpoint, an underwriter may be loath to write the policy without a premium surcharge.

    Best that she refuse the "gift" since the borrower is already in default.
     
  11. ElleMD

    ElleMD Well-Known Member

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    Forget what unlikely charges might occur. Your daughter has been offered use of a car that at any time could be repossessed and leave her stranded. Add to that the fear that the gifter might report she stole it. Why would she even consider this?
     
  12. txls

    txls Well-Known Member

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    Well she needs a vehicle and its' being offered "free". Not many people worry about the potential consequences.
     
  13. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    And then they end up here sobbing:

    "I trusted. What are my rights? Sniff, sniff."

    :rolleyes:
     
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  14. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Mother warned me about strangers offering FREE candy or cute puppies.

    Father scolded me, "Nothing in this life is free son. Run, don't walk away as soon as anyone offers you anything for free."
     

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