1. Free Legal Help, Legal Forms and Lawyers. TheLaw.com has been providing free legal assistance online since 1995. Our most popular destinations for legal help are below. It only takes a minute to join our legal community!

    Dismiss Notice

Grandparents inherit land from uncle

Discussion in 'Joint Ownership' started by alminor, Mar 28, 2018.

  1. alminor

    alminor Law Topic Starter New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Jurisdiction:
    North Carolina
    My grandparents have inherited land from my uncle who died. His will stated that he left all of his property both real and personal to his parents, my grandparents, “in equal shares, share and share alike.” Does this mean that my grandparents own this property by tenancy by the entirety or by tenancy in common?
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

    Messages:
    30,435
    Likes Received:
    4,139
    Trophy Points:
    113


    Without reading the deed, any response would simply be a guess.

    However, as you are NOT one of the property owners, it doesn't affect you one iota.

    That said, if you're so curious that you just must know with precision, trudge on down to the recorder's office and take a look for yourself.

    These days, you can view that information online in many counties.
     
  3. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,879
    Likes Received:
    572
    Trophy Points:
    113

    For starters, "share and share alike" is a term more commonly used by 10 year olds and surprising to find in a will. I'm guessing that means your uncle prepared the will himself and didn't use an attorney.

    That said, whether your grandparents own the property as tenants by the entirety or as tenants in common (or something else) is determined by the language of the deed by which title was transferred to them by the executor of your uncle's estate. Unfortunately, you didn't tell us anything about what the deed says.

    If you're asking whether the quoted language in your uncle's will requires or required the executor to specify a particular manner of joint ownership in the deed, the answer is that it does not. The executor was/is free to state whatever manner of joint ownership your grandparents want(ed).
     
  4. cynthiag

    cynthiag Active Member

    Messages:
    488
    Likes Received:
    96
    Trophy Points:
    28

    People use some weird wording when they write their own wills, it seems, like the "share and share alike".

    I knew somebody who put in his will that he was "of sound body, mind and soul". I've never figured out how the state of your soul would enter into the equation legally, no matter what you believe happens when you die.
     

Share This Page