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Funds in My Paypal for Another Person

Discussion in 'Banking, Finance, Investments' started by TortueViolette, May 18, 2017 at 8:32 PM.

  1. TortueViolette

    TortueViolette Law Topic Starter New Member

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    A friend of mine, A, posted my Paypal email to her social media without my knowledge (I'm not upset about that), and another person, B, sent $2500 to my Paypal, as A was banned from Paypal and cannot open another account. I eventually found out the funds were meant for A and not myself, and after A told me to keep $500, I then offered to I send as much as Paypal would allow me ($900) to A's bank account and then get the rest out a little at a time through cashback at the grocery store. A is upset that I have not been quicker about getting the money out ($720 out of $2000 is still to be given to her), and B has threatened to press charges on me for theft. Is there an actual case here, or are those funds legally mine, as they were purposefully deposited into my personal Paypal account, not A's? I was never planning to keep any of the $2000 after I learned it was meant for me to withdraw for A, but can either the sender or A actually have a civil or criminal case against me for the remaining funds? I did use around $300 of the funds for an emergency car repair, but explained this to A and A seemed completely okay with that the day before this accusation against me.
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    You're setting yourself up for trouble.
    If PayPal is important to you, you're jeopardizing your account by allowing A to use YOU to break PayPal's rules.

    As far as money, I'd give A the money, and disconnect her email from your account, changing your password so as NOT to allow her to do it again.

    You have no idea who is sending her money, if its DIRTY money, or of the cops are watching.

    I'd worry less about a civil suit and more about a criminal charge.

    You're an adult, so you're free to tell me to get to steppin', and bugger myself.
     
  3. TortueViolette

    TortueViolette Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I personally know the sender of
    the money, and I know for sure that the money was not dirty money. It was completely legitimate. I don't really care about the Paypal account, as I plan to stop using it all together in the future. (Not as a result of this. Paypal is obnoxious to deal with.) Is there any other case that could be made against me, seeing as the money was legitimate?
     
  4. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    You still owe A $720.
    She wants it.
    You're sitting on it.
    What do you think you should do?
     
  5. TortueViolette

    TortueViolette Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I still plan on getting the remaining money to A, as that's just the good thing I'm supposed to do. But my question isn't about morals. I'm asking if there's any actual charges either A or the sender can press for anything I've done so far. The money, once in my account, is legally mine to do with it what I wish without penalty even if someone doesn't like what I do with it, correct?
     
  6. KatDini

    KatDini Active Member

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    You know that is not your money, no matter what the source or where it is. o_O

    Give A her money. Problem solved.
     
  7. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    No, it isn't legally your money.
    Legally a bailment was created, a very special type of bailment once you accepted the $500, a bailment for hire.
    If she's smart enough, she can sue you in small claims court for her money.
    The fact that you're holding it, might even rise to criminal charges, if the prosecutor wishes to pursue them, should she file a criminal complaint.
     
  8. TortueViolette

    TortueViolette Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I'm not just keeping A's money, so that's solved there. The sender is the one threatening. There was never any agreement or talk of when all the money would be given over to A, just that it absolutely would all be transferred to her possession.
     
  9. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Your bailment for hire was with the sender for benefit of A.

    A may not know this.

    But, why are you trying to convince me that you did nothing wrong?

    We disagree.

    I have nothing further to say on this matter.

    As I've said before, you're an adult and free to do whatever you wish.

    I'm just another anonymous dude on the 'net.

    Good luck, again, mate, and goodbye.
     

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