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Form signed in front of Notary Public

Discussion in 'Other Family Law Matters' started by littleone70, May 9, 2008.

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  1. littleone70

    littleone70 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I am pregnant and my ex wanted me to sign a paper stating that the baby is not his. We both agreed and indicated on the form that no legal action will be taken now or in the future concerning the matter. We both signed the paper in front of a notary public and had the notary sign it too. Is this a legally bonding paper in the eyes of a court?

    Thank you!
     
  2. seniorjudge

    seniorjudge Super Moderator

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    Q: Is this a legally bonding paper in the eyes of a court?

    A: No.
     
  3. cbg

    cbg Super Moderator

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    Signing in front of a notary means that the notary has confirmed that you are indeed the people you claim you are. The signature or notary's seal has nothing whatsoever to do with how binding the document is; it only proves that you really signed it and not someone signing your name.

    Yes, I am a notary public.
     
  4. Duranie

    Duranie Moderator

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    What is the purpose of doing this? You will have to take legal action against him or whoever the father is, if you go on any type of government assistance. Paternity will have to be established. If you do not file for child support, or government assistance, then there is no need to get him involved legally.
     
  5. bluclouds

    bluclouds New Member

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    Where is the burden of "proof" in signing documents like a Power of Attorney, for example if the person is competent to sign it. For example, if a person has Alzheimers, it's very difficult to say/know where they really are in terms of mental status, there are good days, bad days, lucid moments, non-lucid, etc. If a person signs a POA in front of notary, it's good unless someone argues otherwise? Is it kind of like "innocent until proven guilty," where you're "competent unless proven otherwise," or is it like guilty first, as in "not valid unless proven valid." And for that matter, how do you prove it is valid??? If this all sounds a bit hypothetical, actually this is the situation with our father right now and we are unsure of how useful his signing all these documents are. Thanks!
     
  6. unclemoon

    unclemoon New Member

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    A Power of Attorney typically requires 2 witnesses who know the person naming the agent, in addition to a notary who certifies all signatures are genuine.
     

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