1. Free Legal Help, Legal Forms and Lawyers. TheLaw.com has been providing free legal assistance online since 1995. Our most popular destinations for legal help are below. It only takes a minute to join our legal community!

    Dismiss Notice

Forced to forfeit Breaking a Lease

Discussion in 'Rental Agreements & Subleases' started by Bjohra, Aug 21, 2019.

  1. Bjohra

    Bjohra Law Topic Starter New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Jurisdiction:
    Wisconsin
    Me and my husband just signed a lease we got into arguement n when he gets mad hes fast to act as he has alot of stress from being over the road 6 to 8 weeks at a time so he told the landlord he no longer wanted the house well the landlord message me and told me I need to sign a forfeit letter I talked with him and explain my husband overreacts when hes angry and stated i wanted to keep the house he told me it was best to move on so to me he was refusing well what I did not know that he had put in the lease which he conveniently skipped over as he was reading it to us was that if the house is unoccupied the deposit is forfeited my question is can he get away with this when i still was trying to keep the house n felt like he gave me no choice but to sign doing this is leaving me n my two kids homeless and with out a job since i have already put my notice in for both I feel like he forced me out of it so he can keep the 1700
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

    Messages:
    32,924
    Likes Received:
    5,177
    Trophy Points:
    113

    Yes, if you and your spouse told the landlord you wanted out of the lease.

    If you didn't fulfill the lease, you normally lose money.

    To fully understand the WHY, all you need to do is READ the copy of the lease you signed and possess.
     
  3. Bjohra

    Bjohra Law Topic Starter New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1

    But I was trying to keep the house he told me to move on that to me was telling me no Nd I was forced to sign
     
  4. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,900
    Likes Received:
    824
    Trophy Points:
    113

    Your husband, in a fit of self-destructive rage/anger, canceled the contract with the LL. Understandably, the LL doesn't now wish to rent to you and your angry husband. That you will lose the deposit is entirely your easy to anger husbands fault...stop minimizing his anger issues. Being "on the road" for weeks at a time doesn't excuse his rage issues.
     
    army judge and Zigner like this.
  5. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

    Messages:
    11,364
    Likes Received:
    1,961
    Trophy Points:
    113

    If you did not agree you should not have signed.

    If you choose you can try to recover your deposit through small claims and let a judge decide. The landlord will typically have to prove damages and an effort to mitigate his loss by renting to someone else. There is a chance you could get some if not all of it back. The landlord might even opt to give it back to avoid the hassle of court.
    It does seem shady to hold the deposit after refusing your effort to still move in.
     
  6. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,439
    Likes Received:
    1,171
    Trophy Points:
    113

    In any future posts, please make an effort to use something that resembles proper capitalization and punctuation. Doing so will make it easier for others to read and understand what you write.

    This doesn't make a lot of sense. However, are you saying that you didn't bother to read the lease yourself before you signed it?

    Maybe. One would need a much more coherent summary of the relevant facts and to read the lease to offer an opinion about this.

    I'm not sure or who or what "n" refers to, but are you saying that you signed the "forfeit letter"? If so, please summarize what that letter says.

    That's one way to interpret the OP's largely incoherent post, but it's certainly not the only possible interpretation.
     
  7. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,900
    Likes Received:
    824
    Trophy Points:
    113

    I read the opening post 3 x's. That is what she "seemed" to be saying. I could be wrong....perhaps OP will come back and clarify in comprehensible English. :)
     
  8. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,000
    Likes Received:
    1,594
    Trophy Points:
    113

    Huh? The way you choose not to sign is to not sign. Or are you saying that he held you at gunpoint and forced you to sign?
     
    justblue likes this.
  9. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,000
    Likes Received:
    1,594
    Trophy Points:
    113

    What's going to matter here is the subsequent agreement (contract) that was entered in to.
     
  10. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

    Messages:
    32,924
    Likes Received:
    5,177
    Trophy Points:
    113


    You have no job, no income, according to your prior post.

    Without a job or income, no one would rent to you.

    The landlord rented to yoru spouse.

    Your spouse got angry, and said he no longer wanted to rent the house.

    If you have a beef, it is with your spouse for refusing to house his children.

    You say you have no viable means of support, because you have no income.

    Without a source of income, the deposit must have been made using your spouse's income.

    Bottom line, even if the landlord were to return the deposit, I doubt that he/she would return it to owe.

    The landlord would most likely return the deposit, if that is her/his wont to the person from whence it came!
     
    sandyeggo likes this.

Share This Page