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Corporate espionage threat by a cheating husband

Discussion in 'Other Criminal Law Issues' started by Article 123, Nov 3, 2020.

  1. Article 123

    Article 123 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
    California
    My husband was cheating on me (he was sleeping with his ex female colleague and also engaging in prostitution on his work trips along with his male colleagues), when he denied doing this, I saw his company laptop and forwarded cookies to see which prostitution services he used. He somehow retrieved the deleted email from company server and now he and his company are threatening me for corporate espionage; he is using this to negotiate money in divorce.
    Its a Nasdaq traded company, and he is senior VP Finance and he has great clout with his boss;

    I might have forwarded the cookies to my sibling to help me search prostitution service he used as I was devastated. Although I did not do anything with the data.

    can he actually sue me for this?
     
  2. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    He can't sue you (at least not successfully). However, his employer might be able to sue you successfully if what you did caused some harm, and he certainly can report what you did to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

    I would strongly suggest that you delete your post, which appears to be a public admission to criminal activity under a screen name that appears to be a real name, and then consult with the best divorce attorney you can afford.
     
    shadowbunny and justblue like this.
  3. Article 123

    Article 123 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    But I didn't use the information
     
  4. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    What you describe is not a crime in California.
    I wouldn't worry about it or even acknowledge his accusations.
    If you are divorcing then I assume you have legal counsel. Rely on that counsel for guidance with this.
     
  5. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    It might not be a crime under California law, but what the OP described very likely violated one or more subsections of 18 U.S.C. section 1030.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2020
  6. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    I believe that's a stretch and would not use the word "likely" (which is the word I believe you intended to use).
     
  7. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    I don't see how any federal statute is in play over this.
    A wife sent an email from a computer attempting to catch a cheating husband.
     
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  8. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    Based on the code section cited, it's (very remotely) possible, assuming that certain factors aligned. We have no evidence at all that has been presented that suggests that any of those factors exist in this thread.

    It's kind of like pointing at a random car and saying "that car may have been used as a getaway car during a bank robbery." Well, yeah, I suppose it is possible, just as it is possible for any random car.
     
  9. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    There is also no PROOF of a specific person sending the alleged communication.

    A "person" ALLEGEDLY made an admission on a public website.
    That alleged admission has never been investigated, much less proven true.

    For all I know, the ALLEGED victim MIGHT have posed as the alleged perpetrator as a self serving attempt to defame an innocent spouse.

    Furthermore, people come to this (and other sites) to pose hypotheticals, start rumors, and engage in what some might call "silly reindeer games".

    In my humble opinion, not all who post on the millions of internet sites appear to be what some might call "of sound mind".

    south park GIF on GIFER
     

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