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Complication re: notarizing name change w/o correct identification

Discussion in 'Other Legal Issues' started by Dawna M Redwan, Mar 23, 2020.

  1. Dawna M Redwan

    Dawna M Redwan Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
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    Hi,
    My Massachusetts ID expires on May 14, and I want to get a Real ID as a replacement, because in October, 2020 everyone is going to be required to have one. The Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles requires a birth certificate with an official seal (I have), and proof of any name change from the name on it. I thought I'd try to get a copy of my marriage license as proof, but when I asked the town clerk for a copy, she told me the name on the marriage certificate differs from the name I've been using all these years. She saw that because the application to get a new marriage certificate included a scanned image of my Massachusetts ID.

    I got married in Salem, NH in 1974. The name I always thought was my married and legal name is Redwan, but the Salem, NH town clerk told me the name on the marriage certificate is "Rudwan". I asked for the certificate to be sent to me anyway. I'm thinking that one possibility is to legally change my name to Redwan, and I looked at the form for changing my name in Suffolk District Court in Boston, MA, and the form needs to be notarized before sending it to the court. The ID I've been using has the name Dawna M Redwan on it. The name change document would have the name Rudwan to be changed to Redwan, and the notary when reading the document will see the difference between my ID name and theactual legal name Rudwan, therefore I don't believe I have any chance of getting the document notarized.

    Is there any way around this problem?

    (I wasn't able to add tags.)
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Yes, you could ATTEMPT to change your name LEGALLY.

    How?

    This is how it is done in MA:

    How to Legally Change Your Name in Massachusetts

    1 Get a certified copy of your birth certificate.

    2 Visit the Probate and Family Court in your Massachusetts county of residence.

    3 Complete the petition.

    4 Attach the certified copy of your birth certificate to the petition.

    5 Attend the hearing.

    Legally change your name as an adult

    HINT: Notarizing a document to achieve what you desire has little legal significance.
     
  3. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    I don't see a problem. Dawna M Redwan will sign the document. All the notary cares about is verifying the identity of the person signing the document and attesting that Dawna M Redwan was identified as the person signing.

    You could change your name to Ish Kabibble and it wouldn't matter to the notary.

    However, you might look into correcting the marriage certificate instead of going to court for a name change. Might be a simpler process.

    See:

    Correcting a Vital Record - NHSOS
     
    Zigner and justblue like this.
  4. PayrollHRGuy

    PayrollHRGuy Well-Known Member

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    Also, President Trump announced yesterday that the deadline for Real ID is going to be pushed.
     
  5. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    It is not true that everyone is going to be required to have a REAL ID in October.
    In fact, contrary to what your state has posted online, REAL ID isn't even required at all to fly, enter federal buildings, etc. There are alternatives. For instance, one can use their passport in lieu of a REAL ID.
     
    Highwayman likes this.

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