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Chef questions Weapons, Guns, Firearms

Discussion in 'Criminal Charges' started by ChefL.A., Jun 29, 2018.

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  1. ChefL.A.

    ChefL.A. Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
    California
    I take public transportation. Is it legal for me as a chef to carry my knife set in a roll in my backpack for work purposes?
     
  2. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    I'm going to take a very wild guess for the 2 cents that it's worth and say, probably yes.

    However, CA has a plethora of knife laws so I suggest you google California Knife Laws and study up.

    You'll find several resources. Were a Penal Code section is cited, look up the statute and read it.
     
  3. ChefL.A.

    ChefL.A. Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I think k they're considered Dirk's and daggers... How am I supposed to go to work?
     
  4. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    I would first contact and pose my questions to the LA County District attorney and LA City prosecutor.


    If I were you I'd pose my question to LA Transit Police, LA City Police, and LA County Sheriff.

    You can start by contacting each agency's public relations officer, who should be able to refer you to the right person or office.

    This link was created to help "bikers", but you may be able to find useful information for your purposes:

    Knife Laws in California & Is It Legal Carry One? - RiderzLaw.com

    If I wanted to play it safe, I'd secure a safe place with a lock on the restaurant premises and NOT travel with the tools on any public conveyance.

    Why?

    You could get arrested, even if you're right, which would be troublesome to fix.

    Better safe than sorry.
     
  5. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    I'm curious about a couple things.

    First, why can't you leave your knives where you work?

    Second, it appears the time gap between "adjusterjack's" response and your follow up post was 5 minutes. In that small amount of time, did you do as he recommended: "google California Knife Laws and study up . . . [and where] a Penal Code section is cited, look up the statute and read it"? Hard to believe you could have done that in five minutes.

    Perhaps you read this article, which I located by googling "california concealed knife laws," and which appears to have been authored by a lawyer and former district attorney. That article states, among other things, as follows:

    "California's law prohibits carrying concealed 'dirks' and 'daggers.' Dirks and daggers are knives capable of causing serious injury by stabbing. They may not be carried on one's person if they are concealed in any way. Nor may they be carried in a purse, briefcase or other container.

    California has an 'open-carry' knife law, however. It allows you to carry a dirk or dagger openly in a sheath suspended from your waist.

    The law applies to any knife capable of being used as a stabbing weapon. This is true even if such knives are normally used for lawful purposes. Thus, under California law, 'dirks and daggers' include such items as: chef's knives."

    That seems to answer your question, doesn't it?
     
  6. ChefL.A.

    ChefL.A. Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I'm a pre law student. I've read the penal code before i posted. L.a.p.d. said it shouldn't be a problem as long as they are in a dedicated roll concealed in it like a bag. Not under my coat or something.
     
  7. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Ok. Just know that, if push comes to shove, what "L.a.p.d." told you won't get you anywhere.
     
  8. ChefL.A.

    ChefL.A. Law Topic Starter New Member

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    L.a.p.d. rules l.a... if they don't have a problem with it who will? But what jury is going to convict a chef going g to or coming home from work with his knife roll? Zero ones that's which jury
     
  9. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Mate, it isn't always about a conviction.

    Before a trial, comes police initial contact, perhaps a street hassle, or even an arrest.

    The arrest is everyone's problem.

    Why?

    Well, after fingerprints, mugshots, hang time in a holding tank, frantic phone calls to a pal or bonding company, waiting for bail to be paid, waiting for your release on bail, if a holiday or weekend intervenes; you could spend 24 to 72 hours in a filthy county jail.

    So, you're pre-law student who knew the answer, and just came on here to argue your point.

    I'm a lawyer, licensed to practice for decades, even a retired judge.

    Even if I told you the "magic chant", gave you the "secret finger signs", the [people in LA or CA; would simply guffaw and you'd still be a lousy, filthy jail.

    All of that nonsense said, good luck in your studies, you're free to do whatever you wish, this thread is closed.

    Please don't open another thread to argue your point, debate a hypo, or try to impress us yokels.

    ---------CLOSED------------------
     

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