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Canadian looking for American citizenship Naturalization, Citizenship

Discussion in 'Green Card, Residency, Naturalization' started by Chex123, Aug 16, 2005.

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  1. Chex123

    Chex123 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Umm. I'm 17, and I'm a Canadian citizen. I've lived here my whole life, both of my parents were born here as well. I just graduated high school this past spring, and my boyfriend lives in America. I'm sure this all sounds really stupid, and you're thinking we're just silly children with high hopes, but any help you could offer would be much appreciated. I was just wondering how I might go about getting American citizenship in the future, and possibly living there with him if things happen to work out. Also, if I were living there, I would need to find work, and possibly even continue my schooling there. Should this be the case, what would I need to do to qualify and apply? And also, how long does it usually take? Thank you.
     
  2. NYClex

    NYClex New Member

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    American citizenship will be the last step. Before that you would have to become a "legal permanent resident."

    There are basically only two ways to become a legal permanent resident:
    -by family ties
    -through employment

    The easiest way is by family ties to an American citizen. If your husband, wife, parents or brother or sister are US citizens you can become a legal permanent resident. No other relatives can sponsor (children can, but only once they are adults).

    The other way is through employment. This is very difficult. Basically and practically you need to be very well educated (what the law calls "in a specialty occupation") and have a job offer from an American company for which they don't find an American. Then you might be able to get a green card, that is, become a legal permanent resident. If you are not in a specialty occupation you can practically forget it nowadays.

    Only legal permanent residents can become citizens after 3-5 years.


    As a Canadian you have some other chances to live in the United States without being a legal permanent resident and therefore without the chance to become a citizen. You could qualify for a student visa by enrolling in an American college or university. You can also qualify for certain non-immigrant work-visa under special treaties between Canada and the US (NAFTA visa). That also requires some educational qualifications and an employment offer.
     
  3. Chex123

    Chex123 Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Wow.. This is going to be much harder than I'd hoped.. I have no relatives that have American citzenship, and I'm definitely not specially educated... I'm only out of High School. I'm not old enough to be legally married, and even if I were I'm not ready for a step such as that right now. So that basically leaves me with being accepted to a college or University in America (Which I haven't thought much about) or.. not living there..
     
  4. NYClex

    NYClex New Member

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    Yes, that pretty well sums it up.
     

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