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can landlord force me to name them "interested party"?

Discussion in 'Homeowners, Fire, Casualty' started by flinkychic, Feb 22, 2014.

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  1. flinkychic

    flinkychic Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I am in the middle of a lease term (my third lease on the same residence) and have provided renter's insurance documentation at the time I signed each lease renewal. Recently I got notice from the apartment complex that I was to have renter's insurance (I know that) but that now it must name the complex/realty company as an interested party on the policy. If I do not provide proof of that information by a certain date I would automatically be charged $20/mo for a policy they will provide for me. This disturbs me for a few reasons. First, the policy is coverage for my possessions, so why would the complex be an interested party in regard to my possessions? Second, at no time did my insurance company ask me if there was an interested party. Why would they? This complex isn't a lender and my property isn't named as security for any loan. Third, I don't believe it is legal to make such changes in the middle of my lease contract if it was not part of the agreement I signed. Lastly, I consider my insurance coverage policy to be a contract between myself and the insurer and I feel that demanding to be named as an interested party is an invasion of my privacy in this case. As long as I provide them proof of said coverage, I think they need to keep their nose out of my contract with my insurer. Am I wrong here?
     
  2. CdwJava

    CdwJava Moderator

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    If you do not want to make the changes asked, then pay the additional $20 per month. Easy solution.

    Your other option is to risk going to court if the management decides you have violated the terms of your lease and moves to evict you. Enforcing what you believe are your interests alone could cost you a lot of money, or at least the roof over your head. So, weigh the pluses and minuses and decide what your best course of action might be.
     
  3. mightymoose

    mightymoose Moderator

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    I suggest you read your lease agreement carefully and follow the terms agreed to. Pay the rent that is due and nothing more. If the $20 fee isn't in the lease you will not have to pay it. That doesn't mean they won't ask for it though.
    Talk with the insurance company about whether the landlord should be listed on the policy and the pros and cons of doing so.
     

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