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Can I get out of a lease for an office space if the landlord has not yet signed it? Breaking a Lease

Discussion in 'Rental Agreements & Subleases' started by JamesBond, Nov 16, 2016.

  1. JamesBond

    JamesBond Law Topic Starter New Member

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    1. About two weeks ago, I signed a lease for an office space at another location than the current one. It's been two weeks but the landlord still has not signed. However, the landlord's contractor already started working on the space for improvement a day or two after I signed. I had asked for an estimate for the improvement after signing the lease but still have not received one. On the lease it states the landlord will cover the improvement cost to a certain amount, let's say "x" and the rest will be covered by the tenant. During my initial meeting with the landlord's broker when I toured the space, the broker stated that the landlord will be willing to do a significant improvement. Today, the broker's office notified me that the landlord has already approved TWICE the "x" amount. I am very irate as it means I will be left with a huge tab. Is it possible to cancel the lease now especially since the landlord has not signed?
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Possibly, ask the LL and see what you are told.
    Whatever you're told, get it in writing, signed, dated, and you sign too.

    Keep copies, just in case.
     
  3. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    This post has appeared on two other websites where I posted the following response:

    Likely not without financial consequences.

    The landlord doesn't have to sign it for it to be binding on you.

    I don't know what kind of business you have or how long you have been in business but you made some rank amateur mistakes.

    You should have insisted on both of you signing duplicates of the lease at the same time.

    You should have insisted on the estimate before signing anything.

    And you should have had a cap on the improvement cost and scope put in the lease.

    I could probably come up with a few more if I sat here and thought about it long enough but I think that's enough for now.

    Do you even have a copy of the lease or did you just sign one copy and hand it back without keeping one. If you didn't keep a copy that would be mistake number 4.

    If you did keep a copy, take it to a lawyer and review your options.
     

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