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Bigamy, Deportation, or Citizen Other Criminal Charges & Offenses

Discussion in 'Criminal Charges' started by Jackie Hawkins, Jun 8, 2021.

  1. Jackie Hawkins

    Jackie Hawkins Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Jurisdiction:
    Georgia
    If you are married and discover your spouse is a Bigamist, and you only married him/her just to gain citizenship; then your partner dies without you completing the terms of citizenship, what happens to you? Deported, or does the government or state extend you time to obtain citizenship?
     
  2. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    So, you committed immigration fraud? Charming.

    You will need to seek local assistance from an Immigration Attorney.
     
  3. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Let's speak hypothetically (although I doubt this is a hypothetical situation, and I strongly suggest you consult with an attorney as soon as possible). What you're saying is that the hypothetical non-citizen and his/her citizen spouse committed immigration fraud. Are we also supposed to assume that, at some point, the government has obtained evidence of the criminal activity? If so, what evidence would that be?

    I think what you're asking is whether the non-citizen will suffer the consequences of his/her hypothetical criminal activity or if the citizen spouse's death will wipe the slate clean. Is that what you're asking? If so, I would hope the answer is obvious. If the government has evidence of the crime, the death of the citizen spouse isn't going to make that magically go away.
     
  4. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    You've not only committed immigration fraud but marrying a bigamist means you aren't married so the marriage road to citizenship is no longer available to you.

    I suggest you go back to your home country ASAP, wait the appropriate amount of time then re-enter the US legally as a single person and embark on the road to citizenship the right way.
     
  5. Tax Counsel

    Tax Counsel Well-Known Member

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    I think a far better suggestion is consult an immigration attorney ASAP. Jack does not know all the details of your situation and is not an immigration attorney thus is not in a good position to tell you whether you may still succeed in your citizenship application at this point. If the government discovers that you married only to get citizenship then you are very likely to be deported and face a bar on reentry. So a lot depends on what the government knows, or may learn in the future, about that.

    The fact that your now deceased spouse committed bigamy might be problem. However, if you were unaware of that and entered into the marriage in good faith (i.e. believing that the marriage would be good) then that could help you.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2021
  6. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    The time to deliberate, debate, discuss, and ask questions is before you do stupid stuff.

    The person facing the deluge of dilemmas needs to shut up, ask for a lawyer when arrested, and decline to say anymore than name, address, date of birth, etc...

    The ONLY person who might have been able to snitch out the person facing these issues has assumed room temperature PERMANENTLY and no longer can speak!!!
     
  7. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    That is not correct in Georgia. One would need to have the marriage annulled or have a divorce granted. That puts the widow(er)s of a bigamist in difficult positions. I would be interested to hear what a Georgia family law attorney has to say about this. (The immigration matter would need to be addressed by an immigration attorney, obviously.)
     
  8. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    Presumably, the original spouse could also bring the matter to light...
     
  9. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Many people lose all communication and contact with former spouses, hence the use of "former".

    Most former spouses tend to know far less than some people could imagine.

    I've been told by some people who are former spouses, they maintain little (if any) interest in anything a former spouse(s) does.

    I have no personal knowledge mind you, as I only speak about anecdotal revelations.

    As Mister said when asked about the mail's arrival in the movie "Color Purple", "Could be, could be not".
     
    Zigner likes this.

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