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where can I read past lawsuits?

Discussion in 'Other Legal Issues' started by possum, Sep 20, 2018.

  1. possum

    possum Law Topic Starter New Member

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    hello, I am very interested in learning about law and want to read other passed cases in order to read and pick up what they use and say in other cases. is there a website I can go to in which I can find this sort of thing?
    thank you in advance
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    Here you go, mate, a few sites to get you started:

    Case Summaries > Case Summaries Home

    How To Look Up Your Case for an Arizona Lawsuit

    Cases, Dockets and Filings in the District of Arizona, U.S. District Court

    Find a Case (PACER)
     
  3. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    If you just want to read cases at random, those sources are fine.

    But if you want specific topics, try Google Scholar and read appellate case decisions.

    Google Scholar - Select courts

    You pick a state and then use key words to search for cases that cover the topic of interest.

    If you want to start your education at the top, read the following decisions of the US Supreme Court.

    District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 US 570 - Supreme Court 2008 - Google Scholar

    McDonald v. City of Chicago, Ill., 130 S. Ct. 3020 - Supreme Court 2010 - Google Scholar

    I think that, so far, they are the two most important Supreme Court decisions of the 21st Century.
     
  4. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    What's a "passed case"?

    Written opinions by appellate level courts (e.g., the U.S. Supreme Court, state supreme courts, and federal and state intermediate appellate courts) are readily available through any number of sources online (as are opinions by federal trial level courts). Of course, there are literally hundreds of thousands of published cases, so unfocused searching and reading will be a bit daunting.

    FWIW, the two decisions cited in the prior response are of marginal importance -- even to most of the minority of Americans who own guns. If you want "most significant court decisions of the 21st Century," then google that. You'll get a bunch of lists that will have some cases in common and some variance. It'll be far more manageable than unfocused reading.
     
  5. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Minority? I don't think so. 42% of US households have guns according to a Gallup Poll for 2017. Many us keep our gun ownership private when talking to strangers so if real gun ownership numbers were available, my guess would be that we are no longer a minority.

    Marginal? I'm sure anti-gun people would like to think so.
     
  6. possum

    possum Law Topic Starter New Member

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    thank you guys.
    is there any way I can learn how to prove fraud? or read cases that are based around fraud?

    I know the elements to prove fraud and that they must have sufficient evidence, but I'm not what is enough to be counted as sufficient. which was why I was wanting to read other fraud cases

    hello there, I was wondering what are the best says to actually prove fraud. is there any examples that I could use in order to have actual backing to my claims?
    thank you in advance
     
  7. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Google "[name of your state] fraud elements." Even better if you use Google Scholar.
     
  8. possum

    possum Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I'll give that a try thank y'all
     
  9. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Are you claiming that someone has defrauded you and you want to do this research for your own benefit? If so, you should have said so in the first place and we wouldn't have spent so much time on generalities.

    Arizona defines criminal fraud in ARS 13-2310:

    2017 Arizona Revised Statutes :: Title 13 - Criminal Code :: § 13-2310 Fraudulent schemes and artifices; classification; definition

    Arizona also addresses business and commercial frauds in the criminal code Chapter 22 Sections 13-2201 through 13-2208:

    2017 Arizona Revised Statutes :: Title 13 - Criminal Code

    Arizona addresses civil fraud in Title 44 - Trade and Commerce Chapter 9 Trade Practices Generally:

    2017 Arizona Revised Statutes :: Title 44 - Trade and Commerce

    You'll get the basics by reading the statutes. Then use Google Scholar to see how the higher courts are interpreting the statutes just by putting a statute number into the case search feature.

    Meantime, if you tell us what happened to you, you might get more specific helpful comments.
     

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