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International company International Issue

Discussion in 'Immigration Issues' started by Bix_, May 9, 2001.

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  1. Bix_

    Bix_ Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Does anyone know if a USA company that has aquired another one outside the USA is liable for unlawful employment practices abroad, and could legal actions be started against the USA based parent company? Where could (or should) actions be started abroad or in the USA?
     
  2. Michael Wechsler

    Michael Wechsler Administrator Staff Member

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    This is very vague. Are you talking about suing a US company in the US based upon its wrongful practices internationally that violate international law?
     
  3. Bix_

    Bix_ Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Yes, I mean could I sue the parent company in the US if I get no satisfaction from the local company? I do not know if under international law or US law. Is there a general rule related to coresponsibility of a paret company for wrongful practices (under the eyes of the local laws)?

    Hope this will be a bit clearer.
     
  4. Michael Wechsler

    Michael Wechsler Administrator Staff Member

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    If everything is set up properly it will be very difficult to go after the parent for acts of a subsidiary. Legally they are two completely separate companies. You would need to show that the parent had a significant involvement in the acts of the subsidiary, basically proving that the subsidiary is merely an alter ego for the parent. This is called "piercing the corporate veil" in legal terms.
     

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