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Definition of Religion

Discussion in 'Constitutional Law & Civil Rights' started by Matthew R Overfield, Jan 16, 2022.

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  1. Matthew R Overfield

    Matthew R Overfield Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Is there a universally accepted definition of religion in United States Law?

    If not, then how is it that any person who claims to be religious have any religious rights at all?

    Is someone religious legally because they say they are?
     
  2. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    religion.
     
  3. Matthew R Overfield

    Matthew R Overfield Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Must all courts in the United States follow the United States Supreme Court's interpretation of Religion? Please explain logically.

    Is someone religious legally because they say they are?
     
  4. justblue

    justblue Well-Known Member

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    It is logically explained in the link I provided. You can pull out a dictionary to help with the words you are having trouble with.
     
  5. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Yes.

    The US Supreme Court has been given the power, by the Constitution, to say so. So, when it says so, it is so.

    If they comply with the US Supreme Court's definition.
     
  6. Tax Counsel

    Tax Counsel Well-Known Member

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    The lower courts must follow the decisions of the Supreme Court. That is how our legal system is set up. So when the Supreme Court adopts a definition of religion in a particular set of circumstances, the lower courts will need to apply that definition when they hear similar cases.
     
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  7. hrforme

    hrforme Active Member

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    If you really want to go down a rabbit hole, google "pastafarians" and read through some of the differing opinions.
     
  8. zddoodah

    zddoodah Well-Known Member

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    Huh? Not really sure what sort of response you expect to an abstract question like that.

    Facts and circumstances matter.

    I'm not aware of the SCOTUS ever having "interpret[ed] . . . [r]eligion."

    No.

    Abstract questions will likely result in answers that aren't particularly useful.
     
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  9. Matthew R Overfield

    Matthew R Overfield Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Where is the legally binding document that defines "Religion"? Do you have a copy of that document so that we can see? Can you prove that it is actually the document that you say it is and that it is legally binding?
     
  10. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Matthew, I'm closing this thread for the same reason as I closed the other one. "We" don't have to prove anything to you.

    However, the answer to your questions is at Google Scholar where you can read all off the US Supreme Court decisions that involve the "definition" of religion.

    religion definition - Google Scholar
     
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