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Auto dealer issue

Discussion in 'Drivers License, Vehicle Registration' started by JTNV, Jun 10, 2019.

  1. JTNV

    JTNV Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I live in Nevada. I recently sold my car and the out-of-state dealer (New Hampshire) I bought it from forged my name three times (and had the signatures fraudulently notarized!!) on some paperwork in order to get me a title that needed to be corrected before the local Nevada DMV could issue it to me after the loan was paid off by the new buyer. There were mistakes on the original title (the car was financed so I never saw the first title) that was issued two years ago and it was the dealer's responsibility to correct them. They never did and I was completely unaware of it. It did not become an issue until I sold the car a couple months ago. They stupidly emailed me all the documents to prove that they were working on the problem. I saw all the forgeries, hence I am now informed of their felonies.

    They sent these docs to the local DMV and apparently they have accepted them and the title is now on it's way to me. If I sign this title for the new buyer that I sold the car to, how does that implicate me in this “Intent to fraud” in case the title is audited in the future by either Nevada (my state) or California (the state of the buyer)? Is there any other way the buyer of my car could a get clean title to his car without me signing the one that is based on fraudulent documents?

    I wrote the owner of the dealership and he never responded.
     
  2. adjusterjack

    adjusterjack Super Moderator

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    Notch back the drama. Signing your name and forging your signature are two different things.

    You've heard the saying "no harm no foul." If signing your name to papers facilitated the sale of the car without any HARM TO YOU, then there is no foul.

    You still owned the car, you still had a loan to pay. That didn't change.

    If you don't sign the title over to the new owner he can sue you to rescind the deal, you'll have to take the car back and give him his money.

    Do you want that? I didn't think so.

    If some day, somebody audits the title (and I have no idea what that means) nobody's going to care about the signatures on the documents unless you make noise about it. My advice: Don't make noise. Unless you want to open a can of worms that you can't close.
     
  3. JTNV

    JTNV Law Topic Starter New Member

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    So signing my name and notarizing it (the owner of the dealership is the notary) is not illegal? Sending a falsely notarized document across state lines is not a federal crime? I'm not trying to argue, just asking the legality of what they did. And if someone finds out or a disgruntled employee at the dealership decides to rat their boss out, am I not complicit in their actions? I do appreciate your response.
     
  4. Zigner

    Zigner Well-Known Member

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    Signing it...probably not. The dealer was acting as your agent. Notarizing it...yes. However, as was mentioned above, if you don't make a big deal of it, then it won't matter.
    Not one that anybody would care about.
    No...and nobody is going to "audit" the title.
     
  5. JTNV

    JTNV Law Topic Starter New Member

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    Thanks for the info.
     

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