Intern scholarship

Discussion in 'Student Loans' started by donovan, Mar 1, 2012.

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  1. donovan

    donovan Law Topic Starter New Member

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    I'm currently working as a pharmacist and while in school I worked as an intern in a retail pharmacy. The company offered yearly scholarship. I took the scholarship each year for a total of four years. Every year I would sign a contract that I would work for the company as a pharmacist. So I took the scholarship for 4 years which means I should work for 4 years. I worked a total of 3 and a 1/2 years and had to resign because of traveling expenses. Now the company wants me to pay back the entire amount ($9000 ) because i didn't complete the 4 years. I think I should only pay back for the 4th year ($3000). The contract I signed was for a yearly contract not a 4 year contract. The company states that they don't take into consideration partial worked years. What do I do? I cannot afford to repay that amount due to student loans and so forth.
     
  2. army judge

    army judge Super Moderator

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    You can pay them the money they demand.
    Or, you can ignore their demands to repay them.
    If they want the money, the only legal way for them to get it is to sue you.
    That means they'll have to sue you in the state and county in which you currently reside.
    More often than not, they won't sue you.
    So, you roll the dice (if you don't accede to their demand for tribute) and hope you get a natural winner!
    If you make any counter-offers, you might cripple your defense, if they bring a lawsuit against you.
    In all likelihood, everything you need to know about this is contained in your contracts that you allegedly signed.
    Read those contracts, you might need to argue against them one day, if you choose not to pay.
    They can get money in one of two ways: a) they sue you and obtain a judgment against you; b) you voluntarily acquiesce to their demands for tribute.
    Either way, the ball is in your court.
    If they sue you and win, you'll likely be required to pay their attorney's fees.
    That is why you need to familiarize yourself with the contracts you signed.
     
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