Civil Demand Letters, Retail Theft and the Law

handcuffs

Shoplifting and retail theft may consist of small amounts of money. However, it is a serious crime treated as larceny by the law and taken seriously by retail stores. If you have been caught shoplifting, you may have been told that you will receive a civil demand letter or you might be surprised to see one arrive in your mailbox. If this is the case, it is important for you to understand shoplifting law, civil demand letters and what to expect going forward. [Read more…]

Utah Statute of Limitations, Civil Actions

The Utah Statute of Limitations for civil actions sets a time limit after an injury or civil wrong occurs, during which an injured party can file a lawsuit. After that period of time expires, the injured party is no longer permitted to file a claim in an Utah state court to litigate that matter. The statute ensures that lawsuits that have merit and worthy of being heard are filed within a reasonable time or not at all.

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Oregon Statute of Limitations, Civil Actions

The Oregon Statute of Limitations for civil actions sets a time limit after an injury or civil wrong occurs, during which an injured party can file a lawsuit. After that period of time expires, the injured party is no longer permitted to file a claim in an Oregon state court to litigate that matter. The statute ensures that lawsuits that have merit and worthy of being heard are filed within a reasonable time or not at all.

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Oklahoma Statute of Limitations, Civil Actions

The Oklahoma Statute of Limitations for civil actions sets a time limit after an injury or civil wrong occurs, during which an injured party can file a lawsuit. After that period of time expires, the injured party is no longer permitted to file a claim in an Oklahoma state court to litigate that matter. The statute ensures that lawsuits that have merit and worthy of being heard are filed within a reasonable time or not at all.

[Read more…]

Iowa Statute of Limitations, Civil Actions

The Iowa Statute of Limitations for civil actions sets a time limit after an injury or civil wrong occurs, during which an injured party can file a lawsuit. After that period of time expires, the injured party is no longer permitted to file a claim in an Iowa state court to litigate that matter. The statute ensures that lawsuits that have merit and worthy of being heard are filed within a reasonable time or not at all.

[Read more…]

Idaho Statute of Limitations, Civil Actions

The Idaho Statute of Limitations for civil actions sets a time limit after an injury or civil wrong occurs, during which an injured party can file a lawsuit. After that period of time expires, the injured party is no longer permitted to file a claim in an Idaho state court to litigate that matter. The statute ensures that lawsuits that have merit and worthy of being heard are filed within a reasonable time or not at all.

[Read more…]

Arkansas Statute of Limitations, Civil Actions

The Arkansas Statute of Limitations for civil actions sets a time limit after an injury or civil wrong occurs, during which an injured party can file a lawsuit. After that period of time expires, the injured party is no longer permitted to file a claim in an Arkansas state court to litigate that matter. The statute ensures that lawsuits that have merit and worthy of being heard are filed within a reasonable time or not at all.

[Read more…]

Alaska Statute of Limitations, Civil Actions

The Alaska Statute of Limitations for civil actions sets a time limit after an injury or civil wrong occurs, during which an injured party can file a lawsuit. After that period of time expires, the injured party is no longer permitted to file a claim in an Alaska state court to litigate that matter. The statute ensures that lawsuits that have merit and worthy of being heard are filed within a reasonable time or not at all.

[Read more…]

District of Columbia Statute of Limitations, Civil Actions

The District of Columbia Statute of Limitations for civil actions sets a time limit after an injury or civil wrong occurs, during which an injured party can file a lawsuit. After that period of time expires, the injured party is no longer permitted to file a claim in a District of Columbia state court to litigate that matter. The statute ensures that lawsuits that have merit and worthy of being heard are filed within a reasonable time or not at all.

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